HIS 100 6-3-2 Project 2.docx - Running head 6-3-2 PROJECT 2 RESEARCH PLAN AND INTRODUCTION Project 2 Research Plan and Introduction Noel Figueroa

HIS 100 6-3-2 Project 2.docx - Running head 6-3-2 PROJECT 2...

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Running head: 6-3-2 PROJECT 2: RESEARCH PLAN AND INTRODUCTION 1 Project 2: Research Plan and Introduction Noel Figueroa Southern New Hampshire University
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6-3-2 PROJECT 2: RESEARCH PLAN AND INTRODUCTION 2 Research Plan Research Question : What were the immediate and long-term health effects of the atomic bombings on the citizens of Hiroshima and Nagasaki? Secondary Sources : Malloy, S. L. (2012). ‘A very pleasant way to die’: Radiation effects and the decision to use the atomic bomb against Japan. Diplomatic History, 36(3), 515–545. Retrieved from ? direct=true&AuthType=cookie,ip,url,cpid&custid=shapiro&d b=a9h&AN=74547716&site=ehost-live&scope=site Reynolds, M. L., & Lynch, F. X. (1955). Atomic bomb injuries among survivors in Hiroshima. Public Health Reports, 70(3), 261–270. Retrieved from Historical Context : The Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was a horrific decision by the US, however, it led to the end of world war II. This was a fateful decision by the American President then, Harry Truman being the first time that US ever used an atomic bomb in war even in the world’s history. The dropping of the bomb may have ended the war but the catastrophic effects still live with Japan till today. In Malloy’s article he writes “what did American scientists and policy makers know about radiation effects prior to the use of the bomb? This shows that the dropping of the bomb was also an experimentation by the US to determine the effects that their nuclear bomb can cause. Influence of Historical Context : The bomb at Hiroshima was dropped at the city Centre particularly the business areas with wooden residential structures. This can only show the
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6-3-2 PROJECT 2: RESEARCH PLAN AND INTRODUCTION 3 intensity of damage it had on people and structures. Both Malloy and Reynolds write about the effects that nuclear power had on the lives of people of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. They are both looking at history, to see how much the scientist really knew and what was held back from other members. “The policy of compartmentalization and secrecy enforced by Manhattan Project director General Leslie R. Groves, combined with the single-minded drive at Los Alamos to
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