3.06 something lab questions.docx - Crime Scene...

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Crime Scene InvestigationImagine this…You have just received your degree in Forensic Science and landed your dream job working with CSI and the Police Department in your local area. Now, it's your first day on the job and you have already been assigned to lead the forensic investigationof a crime scene involving a murder that just occurred several hours ago!As the lead forensic scientist, your investigation will involve 3 parts:PART I. You will need to "visit" the crime scene, record observations and identify questions that you still have based on your observations.PART II. After "visiting" the crime scene, plan your investigation by determining what evidence is pertinent to the case, what is extraneous, and identifying the tools you will need. For this part, you'll need to use books and/or online sources to research and gather information on various aspects of the case that cannot be understood from the physical evidence alone.PART III. Finally, after gathering and analyzing the evidence and performing a little research, you and your team will meet back with the local police department tocommunicate the results of your scientific investigation, and generate a hypothesis that outlines the crime based on your investigation and scientific research.Now, you might be wondering how exactly you're going to accomplish this when no real crime has actually been committed?! Don-t worry — with a little imagination and creativity, you can get the job done!Note: When conducting your online research, for example, you may look up 'tools for collecting glass evidence at a crime scene,' 'how to interpret blood splatter,' or anything else that may not have been explained in the unit or in the crime scene description.
Are you ready? Put on your Forensic Scientist cap, fire up your imagination, and let's get started!The Crime + Crime Scene:You walk into the home of Sue Ellen Miller, the victim. Sue Ellen is a middle–aged, unmarried woman who lives alone. She has very long, black hair and is short and petite. She has no pets, children, or roommates. She worked as a museum curator atthe local museum.You notice a pool of blood next to her body on the pink rug. The blood looks almost dry, as if it had been sitting there for several hours. You cannot identify any woundswhere the blood may be coming from without moving the body.

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