Whyte, Groupthink.docx - GROUPTHINK WilliamWhyte,1952 TheU.S.

Whyte, Groupthink.docx - GROUPTHINK WilliamWhyte,1952...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 29 pages.

GROUPTHINK William Whyte, 1952 The U.S. businessman has long kept a suspicious  eye on what’s been going on in Washington.  Meantime some surprising things have been  happening in his own backyard — subtle but  pervasive changes in American ideas that  ultimately may prove more decisive than anything  that has occurred in politics or economics. Editor’s note:  Every Sunday, Fortune publishes a  favorite story from our magazine archives. The Penn  State abuse scandal has rekindled interest in the term “groupthink,” one that was coined in the pages of  this magazine in 1952. What follows is the original  article on Groupthink, which was part of the  magazine’s Communication series.  
 A very curious thing has been taking place in this  country — and almost without our knowing it. In a  country where “individualism” — independence and  self-reliance — was the watchword for three  centuries, the view is now coming to be accepted that the individual himself has no meaning — except, that is, as a member of a group. “Group integration,”  “group equilibrimn,” “interpersonal relations,”  “training for group living,” “group  dynamics,” “social interaction,” “social physics”;  more and more the notes are sounded — each  innocuous or legitimate in itself, but together a theme that has become unmistakable. In a sense, this emphasis is a measure of success. We  have had to learn how to get along in groups. With  the evolution of today’s giant organizations — in  business, in government, in labor, in education, in big cities-we have created a whole new social structure 
for ourselves, and one so complex that we’re still  trying to figure out just what happened. But the  American genius for cooperative action has served us well “Human relations” may not be an American  invention, but in no country have people turned so  wholeheartedly to the job of mastering the group  skills on which our industrial society places such a  premium. But the pendulum has swung too far. Take, for  example, the growing popularity of “social  engineering” (FORTUNE, January, 1952) with its  emphasis on the planned manipulation of the  individual into the group role. Or, even more striking, the extraordinary efforts of some corporations to  encompass the executive’s wife in the organization– often with the willing acquiescence of the wife in the  merger (FORTUNE, October, 1951). And these, as  we hope to demonstrate, are no isolated phenomena;  recent public-opinion polls, slick-magazine fiction,  current best-sellers, all document the same trend.  Groupthink is becoming a national philosophy.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture