Lab Report (2).docx - Biology I Lab Report LEANDER MATTHEW...

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Biology I Lab Report LEANDER MATTHEW BROOKS AMANDA WED 11:00 AM
Abstract This experiment was performed to verify that the amount of protein content that is stated on the nutritional labels of various milk products contains the legitimate amount of protein. To facilitate this experiment, the Bradford assay procedure was performed which by pigments measured the composition of protein in the tested solutions. The amount of protein that is reported on a milk label is conversely, being compared to the protein concertation that is resulted through this experiment. Results gathered from this experiment either support or challenge the idea that labels on milk products contain an accurate amount of protein and thus fall in line with FDA standards. If the experimental protein concertation was around of that on the label, one could claim that milk labels state the accurate amount of protein. Introduction Protein is one essential macromolecule that helps sustain life and proteins are found in drinks such as dairy milk. Protiens in milk contain numerous enymes, proteins that help transport nutrients and proteins that help fight disease, such as the creating of antibodies (Hurley, UI 2009). Nutrition labels are put on milk cartons that along with detailing nutritional value, it states the protein concertation in the milk. These labels are regulated in fact by the Federal Drug Administration, which their mission is to assure that the food supply is safe, sanitary, wholesome, and honestly labeled (“Federal Drug Administration”, 2014). It is important that the milk substances that were observed in fact follow the standards regulated by the FDA so that the milk can be at the correct standards. Some milk products may contain a lesser or increased value of macromolecules like protein due to manufacturing guidelines in a certain state, such as California (National Dairy Council of California, 2017) . This helps make the assumption that milk from different suppliers may have dissimilar properties. As for milk, the USDA National 2
Nutrient Database for Standard Reference listed all the basic nutrients in milk, they found that the average of Low-Fat 1% milk, contains 13 grams of sugar as compared to 1% Chocolate milk contains 25 grams of sugar ( nal.usda.gov , 2015 ). A food label is useful for consumers to determine whether that food contains a healthy content of certain substances like calcium, according to the National Library of Medicine, the serving size on the label doesn’t always represent the healthiest serving size on the label and even the FDA will step in to regulate the correct nutritional facts (medicineplus.gov, 2016). The nutritional value of milk can be examined

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