mod 7 test merged 1.pdf - (7Major)Module7Assessment Due...

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Unformatted text preview: (7 Major) Module 7 Assessment Due Jul 24 at 11:59pm Points 100 Questions 50 Time Limit 45 Minutes Instructions Instructions for this assessment This is a formal assessment of your knowledge based on what you have learned in this module (Module 7). This assessment consists of 30 multiple choice questions and 20 stimulus based questions. It has a 45 minute time limit. You will only have one attempt. Please make sure you are ready to complete the test in one sitting once you begin. If there are any issues, please be sure to document the situation clearly and take note of any questions you have problems with. Submit a Canvas help ticket and message or email your instructor right away. Good Luck! Attempt History Attempt Time Score LATEST Attempt 1 40 minutes 94 out of 100 Correct answers are hidden. Score for this quiz: 94 out of 100 Submitted Jul 24 at 9:10pm This attempt took 40 minutes. Question 1 2 / 2 pts The Zimmermann note involved a proposed secret agreement between Germany and Canada. Russia and Germany. Mexico and France. Britain and France. Germany and Mexico. Incorrect Question 2 0 / 2 pts Woodrow Wilson’s approach to American foreign policy earned the label of __________ diplomacy. balance­of­power dollar Imperialist Isolationist Moral Question 3 2 / 2 pts Two constitutional amendments adopted in part because of wartime influences were the Eighteenth, which dealt with __________, and the Nineteenth, whose subject was __________. prohibition, woman suffrage direct election of senators, woman suffrage women suffrage, prohibition an income tax, direct election of senators prohibition, an income tax Question 4 2 / 2 pts Joseph Pulitzer achieved fame and wealth as a Radio commentator Political cartoonist Photographer Film producer Newspaper publisher Question 5 2 / 2 pts Who was a known anti­imperialist? William Howard Taft William McKinnly William Jennings Bryan Thoedore Roosevelt Question 6 In 1899, an insurrection began in the Philippines because the United States refused to give the Filipino people their freedom. the United States refused to promote the economic and social development of the Filipino people. Communist insurgents attempted to seize control of the islands. American missionaries tried to convert Catholic Filipinos to Protestantism. Spanish citizens living there tried to regain political control. 2 / 2 pts Question 7 2 / 2 pts In the quote above, Senator Lodge was expressing support for a foreign policy of Containment Imperialism Interventionism Isolationism lt;igt;“I object in the strongest possible way to having the United States agree, directly or indirectly, to be controlled by a league [of nations] which may at any time…, be drawn in to deal with internal conflicts in other countries… We should never allow the United States to be involved in any internal conflict in another country.” lt;brgt;lt;/igt;lt;div style="text­align: right;"gt;­Senator Henry Cabot Lodgelt;/divgt; Question 8 2 / 2 pts “German submarine warfare was the single most important factor in causing the U.S. to enter WWI” Evidence supporting this position includes all of the following EXCEPT the Zimmerman Telegram Wilson’s decision to break off diplomatic relations with Germany Wilson’s War message to Congress, April 1917 the Sussex pledge the sinking of the Lusitania Question 9 2 / 2 pts The Open Door policy in China called for which of the following? Equal commercial access by all nations to the existing spheres of influence in China. Reduction of foreign tariffs on Chinese goods. A consortium of nations to govern China. International acknowledgement of China’s right to exclude the trade of any nations. Recognition of Chinese territorial gains in Manchuria. Question 10 2 / 2 pts Some historians call WWI the first industrial war. Several new technologies were developed for warfare. They include all of the following except Airplane Tanks Poison gas Cannons Question 11 2 / 2 pts The Battle of Midway Island was significant because it revealed the superiority of Japanese naval ships and fighter aircraft. it encouraged Germany and Italy to formally declare war on the United States. Japanese forces lost four of their six aircraft carriers and its planes and pilots. it represented Japan's successful attack closest to the U.S. mainland. Question 12 2 / 2 pts Arrange these events in chronological order: (A) V­J Day, (B) V­E Day, (C) D Day, and (D) Invasion of Italy. A, D, B, C D, C, B, A C, A, D, B A, C, B, D B, D, A, C Incorrect Question 13 0 / 2 pts The Battle of the Bulge was significant because it was the last battle of the war in Europe. it showed the superiority of tanks over infantry. it was General Patton's greatest strategic victory. it allowed the U.S. forces to enter Germany. Question 14 2 / 2 pts During World War II, most Americans economically experienced a continuing struggle to find employment. serious hardships due to rationing of essential goods. prosperity and a doubling of personal income. prosperity in the cities but disastrous conditions on farms and in small towns. growing class conflict between the wealthy and the working class. Question 15 2 / 2 pts Eleanor Roosevelt had honed her own skills and developed a personal network of reform activists through running for local offices in New York state. her personal association with women's colleges and sororities. her experience in settlement houses and women's reform organizations. her long resistance to Franklin Roosevelt's personal infidelities. sitting in on Franklin Roosevelt's cabinet meetings when he was governor of New York. Question 16 2 / 2 pts Because so many men were fighting in the war, in the United States the gross national product declined sharply. more than 6 million women entered the workforce. many small and large businesses closed or went bankrupt. turnout for elections declined sharply. Question 17 2 / 2 pts Why did certain people and certain groups, oppose President Roosevelt and his New Deal? Opponents of the New Deal typically opposed it simply because they disliked FDR himself. Communists thought the New Deal was not far enough to the left, industrialists thought it was too far too the left, and other people supported entirely other kinds of programs. Soviet agents working in the United States used their money to influence mass media to turn communists, industrialists, and simple cranks against both FDR and the New Deal. Dr. Francis Townsend tricked people into thinking that his program for employing the country was being eroded by the New Deal. Question 18 2 / 2 pts In the late 1930s, fascist Germany and Italy formed an alliance with what other European country? Russia Portugal Spain Netherlands Question 19 2 / 2 pts By taking the country off of the gold standard, FDR became a secret communist dedicated to ruining monetary policy. became an open socialist hoping to make everyone tied to the government. enabled more currency to be put into circulation. prevented new currency from being put into circulation. Question 20 2 / 2 pts Which of the following factors helps to explain Japanese successes in its Asian conquests? Except for the people of China, Japan's conquests were generally well received in Asia where people were tired of Western imperialism. The Chinese military assisted the Japanese as much as possible, thereby augmenting Japanese strength. Japan's conquests were small and, by international standards, insignificant, so other powers were not concerned. Their military was the best and biggest in the world and could not have been stopped regardless of the opposition. Question 21 _____The strongest criticisms leveled against the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) was that it represented the first stage of “creeping socialism.” produced electricity inefficiently. 2 / 2 pts primarily benefited the South. did not take account of environmental conditions. lacked government control. Question 22 2 / 2 pts _____The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was a major _______________ program of the New Deal; the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) was a long­range __________ program; and the Social Security Act was a major _______________ program. relief; reform; recovery relief; recovery; reform recovery; relief; reform reform; relief; recovery reform; recovery; relief Question 23 2 / 2 pts _____What was a guiding principle of the New Deal economic policies? Pro­business tax breaks would solve the problems associated with urban poverty. Antitrust legislation would destroy the free market economy of the United States. Rugged individualism must be allowed to solve social inequality. The government should leave business alone in order to thrive. Government must assume more responsibility for helping the poor. Question 24 2 / 2 pts _____The 1920’s Ku Klux Klan differed from the earlier Reconstruction­era Klan in that the 1920’s klan Lynched people Was a secret society dedicated to white supremacy Was hostile to immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe, as well as to African Americans Had members dress in white robes and hoods Question 25 2 / 2 pts ____If one were to argue that the United States pursued a policy of strict neutrality from 1919­1933, which of the following would support that view? Failure to join the League of Nations. Signing of the Kellogg­Briand Pact. The Open Door Policy. The Washington Naval Conference. Dawes Plan Question 26 2 / 2 pts _____ Source: J. N. “Ding” Darling, Des Moines Register, March 29, 1937 (adapted) OH, SO THAT’S THE KIND OF A SAILOR HE IS! The cartoon illustrates President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s dissatisfaction with Being unable to appoint minorities to the Supreme Court New Deal programs being declared unconstitutional Congress resisting proposals to strengthen the navy Congress leading the nation into World War II Question 27 _____Buying stock “on margin” meant Purchasing stock on credit. Purchasing only a few shares. Purchasing inexpensive stock. Purchasing risky stock. Purchasing little­known stock. 2 / 2 pts Question 28 2 / 2 pts _____The postwar anxiety and intolerance of Americans in the 1920s was manifested in all of the following ways EXCEPT Scopes trial. Deportation of radicals to Mexico. Immigration Act of 1924. Sacco­Vanzetti case. Resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan. Question 29 2 / 2 pts ____In the 1920s the Fordney­McCumber Tariff and the Hawley­Smoot Tariff _____________ tariff rates, so that by 1930 the tariff rates had been substantially _____________ from the opening of the decade. Lowered; lowered; Lowered; raised; Raised; raised; Raised; lowered Question 30 2 / 2 pts _____The Neutrality Act of 1939, also called the “cash and carry” policy, allowed nations at war to purchase U.S. munitions with cash with the additional requirement that they had to carry them home on their own ships. This policy had what effect? Germany began massive purchasing of munitions and storing them in U.S. warehouses to keep them from British and French hands. The Soviet Union as a non­belligerent could no longer build its military stockpiles from U.S. sources British and French who controlled the Atlantic Sea traffic could get U.S. munitions while Germany and Italy could not. The U.S. could maintain a completely neutral isolationist posture to all nations currently at war. The danger now existed that the war ships of belligerent nations might fight offshore battles with opponents near U.S. ports Question 31 This question refers to the following 1942 poster for Westinghouse. 2 / 2 pts World War II Factory Worker National Archives Which aspect of America’s involvement in World War II is best illustrated by this painting? The mass mobilization of American society to the war effort This image illustrates the extent to which the American population mobilized for participation in World War II on a mass scale. Not only did men readily enlist in the military, but men and millions of women also committed themselves to the workforce in order to meet the needs of wartime production. This woman stepped out of her traditional female role in order to do what had previously been defined as “men’s” work. Questions about American values The popular commitment to advancing democratic ideals Technological and scientific contributions Question 32 This question refers to the following 1917 U.S. government poster. 2 / 2 pts Government Poster Library of Congress Which of the following federal actions during World War I most directly undercut the message of the poster above? Outlawing labor union activities such as strikes Restrictions on freedom of speech Federal restrictions on free speech during world War I, such as the Espionage and Sedition Acts of 1918, directly contradicted the message that the United States was a bastion of freedom and liberty. A ban on all immigration to the United States Limiting African American migration to northern cities 2 / 2 pts Question 33 This question refers to the following quotation. “That Americans were increasingly fearful of the Germans and Japanese is shown by their willingness to accept the Roosevelt administration’s bold support of Britain. Neither public opinion nor Congress prevented the President from doing what he thought was demanded by Britain’s plight, even when it involved using the Navy to patrol the North Atlantic in league with the British Navy.… Roosevelt’s meeting in August, 1941, with Churchill…to write the Atlantic Charter and to agree on postwar aims was undoubtedly the most unneutral act ever committed by a professed neutral. Yet the Atlantic meeting aroused surprisingly little hostile sentiment except among a small group.…The country, in short, was accepting the idea of support of Britain short of war….” Carl N. Degler, Out of Our Past, 1984 Carl N. Degler, Out of Our Past, 3rd ed., (New York: HarperPerennial, 1984). Which of the following groups most opposed the actions of President Roosevelt described above? Isolationists Isolationists were Roosevelt’s strongest opposition as he moved to increase the United States’ involvement in World War II. This group sought to keep the United States out of European and Asian conflicts. Anti­imperialists Imperialists Interventionists Incorrect 0 / 2 pts Question 34 This question refers to the following quotation. “With a profound sense of the solemn and even tragical character of the step I am taking and of the grave responsibilities which it involves, but in unhesitating obedience to what I deem my constitutional duty, I advise that the Congress declare the recent course of the Imperial German Government to be in fact nothing less than war against the…United States; that it formally accept the status of belligerent which has thus been thrust upon it….Neutrality is no longer feasible or desirable where the peace of the world is involved and the freedom of its peoples, and the menace to that peace and freedom lies in the existence of autocratic governments…not by the will of their people. We shall, happily, still have an opportunity to prove that friendship…towards the millions of men and women of German birth and native sympathy, who live amongst us…and we shall be proud to prove it towards all who are in fact loyal to their neighbors and to the Government….They are, most of them, as true and loyal Americans as if they had never known any other…allegiance. If there should be disloyalty, it will be dealt with a firm hand of stern repression….” Woodrow Wilson, Address to Congress’s War, April 2, 1917 Woodrow Wilson, War Messages, 65th Cong., 1st Sess. Senate Doc. No. 5, Serial No. 7264, Washington, D.C., 1917. Which of the following took place during World War I in response to Wilson’s assurance made at the end of the excerpt above? Restrictions on freedom of speech The internment of Japanese Americans Wilson’s assurance at the end of this speech did not lead to the internment of Japanese Americans. Internment of Japanese Americans took place during World War II, not World War I. The first Red Scare Restrictions on immigration from nations in the Western Hemisphere Question 35 This question refers to the 1919 political cartoon below by James P. Alley. 2 / 2 pts Anarchist Political Cartoon The concern illustrated in the cartoon above was most consistent with support for restrictive immigration quotas. This cartoon illustrated Americans’ concerns about some European immigrants’ potentially dangerous political beliefs. Anxieties about European radicals were one of the reasons that many Americans pushed for immigration restrictions in the 1910s and 1920s. U.S. entry into World War I. Progressive reforms. labor unions. 2 / 2 pts Question 36 This question refers to the following quotation. “[Franklin] Roosevelt locked one group out of his honeymoon suite. The bankers and financiers, the rhetorical devils of his presidential campaign, were now resented or hated by millions of Americans. Even Hoover placed much of the blame for the stock market crash on speculation and poor banking ethics….The Emergency Banking Act…provided for the inspection of banks and certification of soundness before reopening. It may have saved the private banking system. The subsequent Glass­Steagall Act of 1933 provided for Federal Reserve regulation of bank investments…and created a Federal Depositors Insurance Corporation to insure small depositors, all of which strengthened banks and gave protection to the most innocent depositors.” Paul K. Conkin, The New Deal, 1992 Paul K. Conkin, The New Deal (Arlington Heights, Illinois: Harlan Davidson, Inc., 1992), 46–47. The primary goal of the legislation described in the excerpt above was to provide relief to the poor. limit the scope of the New Deal. make society and individuals more secure. Roosevelt issued the legislation described above in order to limit the powers and actions of the banking industry and to make American society and the American people more economically secure. He hoped to insure that Americans’ economic well­being would not be so vulnerable to the vagaries of the free market. foster a long­term political realignment. 2 / 2 pts Question 37 This question refers to the following 1932 photograph. Hooverville Photograph Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library & Museum Which of the following factors was most responsible for creating the conditions depicted in the photograph above? Episodes of credit and market instability The conditions of poverty depicted in this photograph emerged as a result of the Great Depression that followed the credit and market instability of the late 1920s. Americans like these suffered a great deal from the high levels of unemployment and poverty that characterized the 1930s. The failure of Progressive reforms Political corruption The transition from a rural society to an urban one Question 38 This question refers to the following 1917 U.S. government poster. 2 / 2 pts Government Poster Library of Congress In 1917, President Wilson brought the United States into World War I based on his stated intention to expand America’s military and economic presence in Europe. pursue a unilateral foreign policy. spread American culture and norms to others. defend humanitarian and democratic principles. President Wilson justified his decision to bring the United States into World War I by stating his intention to defend humanitarian and democratic principles. An advocate of Progressive goals, he emphasized the need to fight tyranny and militarism in Europe and to “make the world safe for democracy.” 2 / 2 pts Question 39 This question refers to the following quotation. “That Americans were increasingly fearful of the Germans and Japanese is shown by their willingness to accept the Roosevelt administration’s bold support of Britain. Neither public opinion nor Congress prevented the President from doing what he thought was demanded by Britain’s plight, even when it involved using the Navy to patrol the North Atlantic in league with the British Navy.… Roosevelt’s meeting in August, 1941, with Churchill…to write ...
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