Chapter 6_Descriptive Research Design_Survey and Observation.pdf - Chapter 6 Descriptive Research Design Survey and Observation Chapter 6 Objectives

Chapter 6_Descriptive Research Design_Survey and Observation.pdf

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Chapter 6: Descriptive Research Design Survey and Observation Chapter 6 Objectives Recognize the various survey methods including telephone, personal, mail, and electronic interviewing methods. Identify the criteria for evaluating survey methods, compare the different methods and evaluate which is best suited for a particular research project. Recognize the different observation methods used by marketing researchers and describe personal observation, mechanical observation, audit, content analysis and trace analysis. Identify the criteria for evaluating observation methods, compare different methods, evaluate which is suited for a particular research project. Describe the relative advantages and disadvantages of observational methods and compare them to survey methods.
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A Classification of Survey Methods Traditional Telephone Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviewing Mail Interview Mail Panel In-Home Mall Intercept Computer-Assisted Personal Interviewing E-mail Internet Survey Methods Telephone Personal Mail Electronic
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Evaluating Survey Methods How do you know which survey method to use? With so many survey methods available (e.g., internet, telephone, mall-intercept, in-home interviews, mail), which will best meet your needs? What factors should you consider? And what are the relative advantages and disadvantages of each survey method?
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Task factors Diversity of questions and flexibility Use of physical stimuli Sample control Quantity of data Response rate Criteria For Evaluating Survey Methods
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Task factors Diversity of questions and flexibility Can the respondent interact with the interviewer and the survey questionnaire? Can the respondent ask clarifying questions? Use of physical stimuli Physical stimuli include taste tests, a product prototype, commercials, or promotional displays. Sample control The ability to reach your target population. For example, with a mail survey, you do not actually know who has completed your questionnaire, therefore mail surveys have low sample control. Quantity of data How much data can you collect? How much time is a respondent willing to spend on your questionnaire? Response rate The percentage of the total attempted interviews that are completed.
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