56.WorkbookW17-2.pdf - And so now you will begin to work at...

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Unformatted text preview: “And so now you will begin to work at your writing. Remember these things. Work with all your intelligence and love. Work freely and rollickingly as though you were talking to a friend who loves you. Mentally (at least three or four times a day) thumb your nose at all know-it-alls, jeerers, critics, doubters.” —Brenda Ueland Introduction to Creative Writing Workbook Professor Goldberry Long 56:Wint 17 Welcome to the World’s Largest Creative Writing Class! For one quarter, you are going to be a writer. What does that mean? You’ll WRITE all the time, at least 4 times a week. You’ll READ all the time. You’ll PUBLISH your writing in a blog. Yes, really!. PUBLISHING is scary, but it’s also thrilling. At the end of this class, you might be a better writer in your chosen field (even if it isn’t creative writing ). You will be better at choosing language. Best of all, writing will be easier. It will be easier to get your first words on paper, and easier to revise them into something better. You might find you are a better reader, too. And you’ll probably be a great storyteller at a party. An important note about content: This class will encourage you and your classmates to be open and honest while writing. Because this is an amazingly diverse campus, diverse experiences and world views will be expressed. Your writing, and your classmates’ writing, may contain material that makes people uncomfortable, and may even deeply offend some of you. There will be readings and frank discussions about all kinds of experiences, including those of the human body. There will be offensive language. If you are easily offended, you may want to reconsider your enrollment in this class. What do I do if I added the class late? Regardless of when you add, from the first day you attend class, you will have SEVEN DAYS to complete ALL missed work. After that, the work will not be accepted. You are accountable for all required class work. Introduction to Creative Writing Workbook 3 Distribution of Grades PASS/FAIL Assignments 1 point per assignment. Grade is calculated as a percentage of total possible points. Late assignments not accepted unless absence is excused (see page • 20% -­‐-­‐ Powerwriting • 20% -­‐-­‐ Formal Craft Exercises 1 • 05% -­‐-­‐ Lecture Participation : 25% clickers, 75% talking points • 10% -­‐-­‐ Discussion Participation: GRADED Assignments 100-­‐point scale: 90-­‐100%: A-­‐ to A+ ; 80-­‐89.9%: B-­‐ to B+; 70; 79.9%: C-­‐ to C+; 60-­‐69.9% D-­‐ to D+; 59.9% &below: F • 10% -­‐-­‐ Midterm 56 Project • 20% -­‐-­‐ Final 56 Project • 15% -­‐-­‐ Final 56 Chapbook Grade Penalties For Late, Incomplete, or Inappropriate Work Late Work • • P/F late assignments are not accepted, except for legitimate reasons (see page 5). Quality Assignments are penalized 10% of grade for each day late. Inappropriate Work • • • You will not be penalized for open and honest material. However, your work can be judged to be INAPPROPRIATE for the following reasons. It does not follow the assignment instructions. Ø It attacks classmates or teachers. Ø It is hate speech. Ø If your work is judged inappropriate, it will not be counted as completed. For your first offense, you will be told to rewrite it. Subsequent violations will simply be recorded as zeros. Incomplete Work Read each assignment’s instructions carefully to be sure you are completing all parts of the activity. The following work will be penalized for incompleteness. 10% off for each missing item. • Midterm Rough Draft 56 Project (Rubric, FCE 1-­‐diagnostic, Self-­‐assessment, “Why I chose this topic,” Powerwrite for Rough Draft) • Final Chapbook (Rubric, FCE1 56 Project, Argument for Grade, all powerwrites, all FCEs -­‐-­‐ detailed instructions) • Final 56 Project (included in chapbook) Texts and materials Clicker • Clickers are required for this class. You can purchase them at the bookstore, online, or from other students. Register them on the class iLearn page. Make sure you buy the UCR approved clicker. The bookstore can tell you what kind of clicker. The Class Workbook in a 3-­‐ring Binder: the substitute for a textbook. This binder must contain: • • • A printed version of this course Workbook ALL your online and classroom writing: Powerwrites, FCEs. Do not throw any of your writing away. You will need it for your Chapbook. All drafts of your 56 Project. The Chapbook 3 prong *paper folder * (This is not a 3 ring binder) • At the end of the quarter, you will transfer your creative WRITING from your binder (which is big and heavy) into a lightweight folder with bendable prongs. Introduction to Creative Writing Workbook 5 Participation Grade A note about talking while I am lecturing: Do not talk in class. If you chronically (more than 2 times) do this, you will lose participation or clicker points. Anyway, it’s rude. Purpose: To actively engage in the course material; to learn by thinking out loud. To become a participant in your education, rather than a passive recipient. To give the rest of the class the benefit of your good ideas and questions. To push your classmates’ thinking in new directions. 5% — Lecture PARTICIPATION: • Each lecture, 2 TAs will be “up.” When the TA is yours, you are eligible to earn Talking Points. Each TA will be up 4 times. • During the lecture, I will ask questions or invite participation. Also, asking your own question can earn you participation points. • Write your name, your TA’s name, and your section number on a piece of paper. When you raise your hand, hold the paper in your hand. A TA will take your paper when you are called on. • Shy people: there will be times when I ask for words. You can shout one word and have it count. 10% — Discussion PARTICIPATION: • Evaluated by your TA. Includes: • Offering opinions, answering questions, and asking questions. • Completing in-­‐class exercises. • Any other markers of participation as determined by your TA. TAs have full discretion over how they calculate discussion participation. Attendance, Tardies, Absences Attendance We do not take attendance. As adults, you make your own decisions, and accept consequences of those decisions. That said, you won’t earn an A in this class if you are frequently absent, because there are powerwrites due every class. The math is simple. If you miss too much class, you’ll probably get a C. Tardies If you arrive to class late and don’t do a complete Powerwrite, you’ll receive a zero for your Powerwrite. Absences No late FCEs or Powerwriting is accepted unless your absence is excused. If your absence is deemed excused, you have one week from the date of your absence to turn in the work. The only acceptable excused absences are: Excuses before the absence. Present your TA (not Goldberry) with proof of your need to be absent BEFORE you are absent. PLAN AHEAD. These excuses won’t be accepted after your absence. Acceptable advance excuses include:a religious holiday, You’re on a UCR team and there’s a game; A planned crisis (for example, a funeral or an operation) Excuses after the absence. You must present your excuse to your TA the day you return to class. Only verifiable emergencies may be excused. Talk to your TA). Provide a doctor’s note, or other proof of a family emergency (e.g., an obituary). Posting FCE Assignments online IMPORTANT: EACH FCE MUST BE POSTED SEPARATELY OR YOU WON’T GET PROPER CREDIT!! The grades are calculated by counting your number of entries. If you enter 3 in one post, that will count as ONE entry, not three 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Log into your iLearn account Click on the name of the page: “Introduction to Creative Writing” Click on the orange link to the left that says, “Post your assignments here” Find your TA's name and click on it Click on the FCE journal COMPOSE YOUR WORK IN A WORD PROCESSING PROGRAM, NOT ONLINE. Students have lost work when they lost their internet connection! 7. Click “New entry” 8. Copy and paste your work into the FCE journal. Be sure to submit! For all assignments, PRINT A HARD COPY. KEEP IN YOUR BINDER. Hard copy due in Discussion Section next week. Your work is necessary for in-­‐class activities. Your TAs will be checking your binders in discussion, and if you don't have all your materials you will lose points. 9. The blog always closes at 10pm Saturday. If your exercise isn’t posted by then, you will not receive credit. Turning in Lecture Powerwrites to your TA 1. Write your name, the date, and your TA’s name at the top of the page 2. After class, find your TA outside the building 3. Give your powerwrite to your TA Turning in Midterm and Final to your TA 1. Turn in after class 2. Use a three-­‐prong folder 3. Follow 56 Project and Chapbook instructions carefully No assignment in this class is worth so much that it could cause you to fail the class. • If you ignore any single category of assignment, you won’t earn an A in this class. • You are an adult, and you must decide what grade you would like. If you want an A, do everything. • The surest way to get a poor grade in this class is to skip your FCE homework. Introduction to Creative Writing Workbook 7 NO LAPTOPS OPEN IN CLASS. EVER. NO TEXTING IN CLASS. EVER. If you are caught doing these things, your equipment will be confiscated. You may retrieve it by presenting a student ID to a TA at the end of class.2 2 You can tell I’m serious because I put this here, on its very own page. Why? Because studies have shown that taking notes by hand is better for learning. Also, I know you’ll check your Snapchat account. Also, I am old and grumpy and it’s rude. How can I contact Professor Goldberry? My office hours are 2:30-­‐4 Thursday. But there usually is a long line. The best way to contact me is to email me. Your emails must follow the following rules. This may seem unnecessary, but you should see the emails I have gotten from students! CHECK THE SYLLABUS FIRST. If your answer is in the syllabus, I may simply say that. To: [email protected] From: [email protected] Subject line must contain the number 56 and the Subject: CRWT 056: Mother hospitalized specific topic of your email. It’s acceptable to address me by my first name. If you want to be Dear Goldberry, formal, use “Professor Long.” I am not “Mrs. Long.” My mother is in the hospital and I won’t be able to attend class. How should I demonstrate that this is an excused absence when I return? This is a writing class. Use conventional spelling and grammar. No text code. Sincerely, Sign your name. I can’t help if I Pretendy don’t know who you are. Here is an actual email I got from a student. Don’t be like this student. (There was no signature – lucky for the student). Hey, I missed class – hunover. Can u tell me if I mist anything? Introduction to Creative Writing Workbook 9 Assignments Assignments presented in the order they are due Week Tuesday Discussion Activity Thursday Sunday FCE(prep for next week) One: Introduction 1/10 Define: Introduction, Creative, Writing “This Be the Verse” Diagnostic Rough Draft/homework: revise Icebreakers, introductions, syllabus 1/15 FCE2: 56 Things FCE 3: Powerwriting Instructions: Learning to PW FCE 4: Vandalize the Syllabus Two: Power Writing (1/16 = no class) 1/17 PW1 How to write an essay; Intro to Exploratory PWs PW: ideal Essay, then discuss PW: most interesting thing; 56 things game; one detail no one else has; “Out of character;” Cliches 1/12 Evaluating Writing due: Hard copy FCE1: Revised Diagnostic; is it good? write something beautiful; Anxiety of writing; 56 examples 1/19 PW2: One item from your 56 Things FCE Powerwriting continued Three: Concrete Abstract (lightly) 1/24 PW:The story of my scar Telepathy= concrete Lightly= abstractly (no real revelations – hiding behind generalities) Serious = real=concrete Fear/Fear/Fear – 1 abstract/3 diff. concrete stories /almost drowning/my first kiss/knife to neck PW: 1 Expl. Powerwrite Collective Grandma poem Abstract/concrete game (love smells like) 1/26 PW: From Ex. Inventory My Grandma Norma – I won’t take this lightly; letting you know her = keeping her alive 1/29 FCE8: That sort of person FCE9: UCRFacts/Truth FCE10: Dulce Facts/Truth Four: Truth 1/31 PW: my bubblegum story 5 Exploratory PWs due She was a bad girl: bubblegum story Tips: choosing a topic PW: One Expl PW Compare Fixed 56 projects Collective UCR 2/2 PW: my Vietnam 5 Expl PWs due She was a bad girl: Christmas story 2/5 FCE: Choosing Topic FCE: Voice Inventory FCE: Vandalize myself Five: Voice 2/7 PW: Betrayed 2 Explo PWs due What is voice? Forbidden Words/Voice readings Devoice this sample 2/14 56 PROJECT ROUGH DRAFT PW from your own prompt read 2 examples PW from your inventory Read powerwrites aloud Voice games First person samples 2/9 Maybe this should be about the 56 project?? How to choose, how to fix/ the rest of quarter 2/12 FCE: Finding Tone FCE: Hamburger Man FCE: That Sort of Person Circle concrete, abstract, write questions in margins; looking for chronology 2/16 PW: A time I was afraid (and then) The importance of Chronology as an organizational device Seven: Tone Packed Images (2/20 = no class) 2/21 PW: chocolate – catalogue, then story connotations; cataloguing vs. packed detail; chocolate (meaningful detail) Eight: Words 2/28 PW: Story in the verb 56 Project examples – look at verbs just nouns and verbs should give a sense of the story Small groups: Read 56 projects and guess tone; synonyms/circumstances game Find cataloguing/make it concrete Noun/verb lists Small groups: Circle Adjectives/adverbs help find better verbs 2/23 PW: single ladies Recall Norma & Fear/Fear/Fear: what imagery do you remember? what was the tone of each? 3/2 Adjectives and Adverbs Abstract/concrete – when needed, when not 2/19 FCE: Fix this 56/Ruin this FCE Packed Details Q&A FCE: Abstract, Concrete, Packed FCE: 56 PROJECT REVISION A (Chronology) 2/26 FCE: Seventeen Words FCE: 56 PROJECT REVISION B: (Tone, packed imagery) Nine: Sound Rhythm 3/6 Bounce 56 Project example volunteers? Small groups: Look at sentence length; does it enhance meaning? 3/9 Final revision (56 project model) 3/12 56 Project Blog: 56 Final Revision FCE: Celebration poem Ten: Celebration 3/13 Celebration Poems Celebration and goodbye 3/16 56 PROJECT FINAL DRAFT CHAPBOOK 56 Project reading End Instruction Six: Revision organization 1/22 FCE4: Exploratory Inventory FCE5: Steven King FCE6: Grandma Poem FCE 7: 56 Project Instructions 3/5 FCE: Sentence Rhythm FCE: 56 Proj Revision C (Words, sentences, and final revision) Introduction to Creative Writing Workbook 11 Week One: What is Creative Writing? Due Thursday, 1/12: Revised FCE 1: Diagnostic with handwritten rough draft. (Turn in to TA after lecture) Diagnostic Rubric: Read it and be prepared to use it in class Week One “Trust thyself: every heart vibrates to that iron string.” Ralph Waldo Emerson “Being myself, I sing the soul’s immediate joy.” Theodore Roethke FCE 1– Diagnostic Revision 1 point for completion Due Thursday, 1/12 after lecture Purpose: • In this class, you will be measured against yourself. • The Diagnostic FCE provides a snapshot of your creative writing skills at the beginning of class. • Your 56 Project will be graded by evaluating how far you have progressed from this starting point. Procedure: You will complete an in-­‐class writing assignment. Your TA will initial this assignment as you leave class. Take that initialed draft home, type it, and revise it as you wish. The final work should be NO MORE THAN 750 words. Only the first 750 words will be read and evaluated. PRINT OUT a copy and bring it to the next lecture to turn in with the intialled, handwritten draft and the rubric on page 1 of this workbook. Introduction to Creative Writing Workbook 13 Rubric for Quality Assignments. Use only one copy of rubric. Include this same copy with all assignments. Your name here: Your writing demonstrates this skill level (to the right) Introductory Writing shows very little knowledge about the element. Still Learning Writing shows some knowledge, but need to learn much more. Adept Writing shows much knowledge, but more still needed Description of skill (below) Writer uses PW to access creativity and voice; to enter the experience with all 5 senses; to write fluently; to explore and deepen understanding of material. Follows powerwriting rules. Mastery Profound expertise: Tolstoy Writer rewrites to significantly deepen, enrich, and expand meaning. The revisions are a creative act, and not simply editorial changes. Voice The writing is unique to the writer; nobody else sounds like this; the writing is the writer's "word personality" on paper. Concrete Details (imagery) Writer describes details with the five senses to create a vivid experience for the reader. Writer allows the concrete experience to catalyze the abstract (emotional) subtext in the reader. Packed Details (connotatio n tone imagery) Writer chooses representative imagery to suggest the whole experience, and omits less meaningful details that would clutter the writing and undermine its effectiveness. Nouns, Verbs, adjectives, adverbs (diction, Connotation tone) Writer chooses verbs and nouns that vividly create reader's experience. The verbs and nouns are concrete, filled with tone, and reflect the voice of the writer. Adjectives and Adverbs are used rarely and carefully, after writer has exhausted the potential of verbs and nouns. Sound Rhythm (diction, syntax; tone Writer chooses qualities of sound, sentence lengths, and sentence structure to enhance the tone of the writing, adding emotional subtext to the reader's experience. Tone: Writer chooses all elements above to create an emotional subtext. The amount of work you will needed to increase your skill level Hard work is required. Much work needed, some skill present. Many skills present, but work still needed Almost no work needed Writing process skills: Power-­‐ writing Revision Elements of Craft: Truth and Weight Description of skill (below) The writer hasn't "come to the page lightly;" writer’s material reveals something meaningful about his/her unique knowledge of the world. Write your understanding of how this rubric functions here: Week Two: Powerwriting Due Sunday 1/15 10 pm: FCE 2: 56 Things FCE 3: Vandalize the Syllabus FCE 4: Learning to Powerwrite FCE 5: Practicing Powerwriting Week Two “All children are artists. The problem is to remain an artist once you grow up.” Pablo Picasso “Planning to write is not writing. Outlining, researching, talking to people about what you're doing, none of that is writing. Writing is writing.” E.L. Doctorow “How can I know what I think until I see what I’ve said?” E.M. Forster Introduction to Creative Writing Workbook 15 FCE 2: 56 Things About Me Due Sunday 10 pm on iLearn List 55 things that are true of you: These can be anything – from height or weight, to personal history. (Read the second step, below, before you begin). The sneaky 56 : Somewhere in the middle of your list, in two or three sentences, describe one thing about yourself that you are certain is not true of anyone else in this class. You may lie, but your lie must be utterly convincing. For example, if you were to say, "I was a general in Iraq," no one would believe you, unless you gave convincing evidence to support what you say. (Hint: the more specific you are, the more convincing you are). You do not have to lie. As your list gets longer, it will be harder to come up with items. Try to remember specific events that happened in your life – small memories of importance to you. You might say, for example, “When I was twelve I got a polished piece of granite as a birthday present from my Uncle Harry, who thought it was a sensible gift.” Bring a hard copy to Discussion Section FCE 3: Vandalize the Assignments Find the page in your syllabus with the distribution of grades (what each assignment is worth). Find the rubric. (Hint: it’s a grid, and the first word at the top left-­‐hand corner of the page is “rubric”). Vandalize the course requ...
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