{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

ISS215syllabuss.Spring_2008-1

ISS215syllabuss.Spring_2008-1 - Draft DRAFT SYLLABUS ISS...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Draft DRAFT SYLLABUS ISS 215 Social Differentiation and Inequality Sections 007 Spring 2008 Credits: 4 Class time and location: Tuesday & Thursday 3:00 p.m. to 4:50 p.m., Rm # B104 Wells Hall Professor: Shobha Ramanand, Ph.D. Office: 116 Linton Hall Telephone: 517-432-7337 Office hours: Monday & Wednesday --Noon to 2:00 p.m. in 116 Linton Hall or by appointment Email: [email protected] Class Teaching Assistant (TA): Brikena Balli Office Hours: Main Library near the Newspaper Stand, Tuesday 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., or by appointment Email: [email protected] Course content and objectives The course examines two features that characterize all modern societies: social differentiation and social inequality. Social differentiation refers to differences in the social makeup of the population (class, race/ethnicity, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, etc.). The most critical of such differences in American society are class, race, ethnicity, and gender, and we will focus primarily on those. Social inequality is the unequal distribution of the society's resources, which comprise various forms of wealth, power, and prestige. Social differentiation and social inequality are closely interrelated. At the conclusion of the course you should be able to: (1) understand the social diversity of the U.S. and other societies; (2) recognize societal inequalities in wealth and power; (3) appreciate the social and individual consequences of class, race, ethnicity, and gender; (4) examine the impact of globalization on social differentiation and inequality; (5) think seriously about how wealth and power are distributed and whether that distribution can—or should—be changed; (6) take the information and ideas acquired in the course and apply them to your own social experiences and, more broadly, use them as the basis of opinion and action in your community and society. Instructional Model : Lectures, Discussions, Films. Required Work : Multiple-Choice examinations-based on readings and material presented in class, multiple-choice quizzes, participation in class and book discussions. Attendance is required.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern