ISS215syllabuss.Spring_2008-1

ISS215syllabuss.Spring_2008-1 - Draft DRAFT SYLLABUS ISS...

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DRAFT SYLLABUS ISS 215 Social Differentiation and Inequality Sections 007 Spring 2008 Credits: 4 Class time and location: Tuesday & Thursday 3:00 p.m. to 4:50 p.m., Rm # B104 Wells Hall Professor: Shobha Ramanand, Ph.D. Office: 116 Linton Hall Telephone: 517-432-7337 Office hours: Monday & Wednesday --Noon to 2:00 p.m. in 116 Linton Hall or by appointment Email: ramanand@msu.edu Class Teaching Assistant (TA): Brikena Balli Office Hours: Main Library near the Newspaper Stand, Tuesday 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., or by appointment Email: ballibri@msu.edu Course content and objectives The course examines two features that characterize all modern societies: social differentiation and social inequality. Social differentiation refers to differences in the social makeup of the population (class, race/ethnicity, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, etc.). The most critical of such differences in American society are class, race, ethnicity, and gender, and we will focus primarily on those. Social inequality is the unequal distribution of the society's resources, which comprise various forms of wealth, power, and prestige. Social differentiation and social inequality are closely interrelated. At the conclusion of the course you should be able to: (1) understand the social diversity of the U.S. and other societies; (2) recognize societal inequalities in wealth and power; (3) appreciate the social and individual consequences of class, race, ethnicity, and gender; (4) examine the impact of globalization on social differentiation and inequality; (5) think seriously about how wealth and power are distributed and whether that distribution can—or should—be changed; (6) take the information and ideas acquired in the course and apply them to your own social experiences and, more broadly, use them as the basis of opinion and action in your community and society. Instructional Model : Lectures, Discussions, Films. Required Work : Multiple-Choice examinations-based on readings and material presented in class, multiple-choice quizzes, participation in class and book discussions. Attendance is required. 1
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This note was uploaded on 03/22/2008 for the course ISS 215 taught by Professor Lang during the Spring '06 term at Michigan State University.

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ISS215syllabuss.Spring_2008-1 - Draft DRAFT SYLLABUS ISS...

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