Lab Chem.docx - Intermolecular Forces Lab Solids and...

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Intermolecular Forces Lab: Solids and Liquids Wu, A ,. Shaikh, K., Luo, J ., Glass, A., Teacher, Heinrichson Lab Section G, 2/4/2016 1. Explain in terms of type and relative strength of bonds, the presence or absence of odors of naphthalene and sodium chloride. Could a substance be relatively volatile and not have an odor? Explain and give an example. NaCl has London Dispersion and ionic bonding. It has a high IMF, as the cations and anions attract each other greatly. Therefore, it is not very volatile, and stray molecules are very unlikely to sublime, as gas molecules would cause an odor. However, Naphthalene has only London Dispersion keeping it together. This is very weak compared to NaCl’s ionic bonding. Therefore, Naphthalene has relatively low IMF. It is extremely volatile, and this causes the strong odor. A substance can be volatile and not have an odor. Iodine has a low IMF due to the fact it only has London Dispersion, and only has a very slight odor. Other chemicals might also be similar. 2. Explain in terms of type and relative strength of bonds the difference in melting point of the two substances listed in Question 1. The two substances naphthalene and sodium chloride have different melting points. Naphtalene’s melting point is 80.26°C while the melting point of sodium chloride is 801°C. That is a ~10 times difference! The reason Naphthalene’s melting point is so low is because only has London Dispersion keeping it together. On the other hand NaCl is an ionic compound with ionic bonds. Ionic bonds are strong, especially compared to London Dispersion, and so it makes the melting point high. 3. Are you comparing the relative strengths of covalent and ionic bonds when you are comparing relative melting points of sodium chloride and naphthalene? Explain. No; ionic and covalent bonds are not being compared. These are intramolecular forces; they are within the individual molecules. Melting points are based on intermolecular forces, which are between the molecules. In NaCl’s case, the ionic bonds holding it together in a lattice are both
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