ARCH2300-5010_Course_Outline_2017_070917.pdf - ARCH 2300\/5010 Fall 2017 0.5 Credits INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ARCHITECTURE Instructor Paul Holmquist

ARCH2300-5010_Course_Outline_2017_070917.pdf - ARCH...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 16 pages.

1ARCH 2300/5010 Fall 2017 0.5 Credits INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ARCHITECTURE Instructor: Paul Holmquist [email protected] AA306 | Office hours: Fri 11:45 – 1:30, or by appt. Teaching Assistants: Pallavi Swaranjali Ryan Stec [email protected][email protected] AA306 | Office hours Fri 12-2 AA525 | Office hours TBD Estaban Fernandez-Escobar [email protected] AA306 | Office hours TBD Course Location/Time: Minto Centre 5050 | Fridays, 8:35am – 11:25am TOPIC OF THE COURSE The past is never dead. It’s not even past.- William Faulkner, Requiem for a NunARCH2300/5010 explores the origin and development of modern architecture as the specific engagement of architectural practice and theory with modernity as a general, European cultural condition emerging in the mid-eighteenth century. In particular, the course examines modern architecture as the response to the disciplinary crises of architecture accompanying the shift from a religious, cosmological worldview to a scientific and historical one by the early nineteenth century, manifest in the rejection of tradition, a radical orientation to the future, the progressive development of modern science and technology, and the rise of industrial capitalism. The history of modern architecture is that of its constant search, over the period spanning between roughly 1750 and 1939, for the principles, modes, forms and languages capable of accommodating and expressing a distinctly new ‘modern’ life, poised between an unrecoverable past and an uncertain, if utopian, future. The course comprises three parts, each exploring architectural developments against their socio-cultural conditions with respect to the key notions of modernity, modernization, modernismand the Modern Movement. Part One examines the decline of the Vitruvian tradition in the eighteenth century with the emergence of modernity, and the advent of new programs, building types, modes of construction and expression, and the strains of functionalism and utopianism that come to predominate in modern architectural theory and practice. In Part Two, we consider the architectural response to modernizationand industrialization in the nineteenth century in the
Background image
2adoption of new construction materials and technologies, and with respect to new tensions arising between handicraft and machine production, structure and ornament, historicism and invention, tradition and innovation, and rationalism and poetic expression. We will also survey the rise of the metropolis as an alternatively pragmatic and utopian program for modern architecture. Part Three explores the Modern Movementin architecture, and modernismgenerally, as the conscious embrace of modernity and the modern way of life through alliances with art, technology and politics in the first half of the twentieth century. We conclude by briefly considering how the fracturing of the modern movement following the Second World War and its subsequent crisis in
Background image
Image of page 3

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 16 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture