timelinePart 2.pdf - On Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev...

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Suez Crisis (October 29, 1956 - November 6, 1956) Sputnik (October 4, 1957) Berlin Crisis (1958 - 1962) The Cuban Revolution (January 1, 1959) U2 Incident (May 1, 1960) John F. Kennedy Assassination (1917 - 1963) — President (1961 - 1963) Space Race (April 12, 1961 — July 20, 1969) Bay of Pigs (April 17, 1961) Cuban Missile Crisis (October 16 — October 28, 1962) Summer of Love and Woodstock (1967) On October 29, 1956, Israeli armed forces pushed into Egypt toward the Suez Canal after Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser (1918 - 70) nationalized the canal in July of that same year, initiating the Suez Crisis. The Israelis soon were joined by French and British forces, which nearly brought the Soviet Union into the conflict, and damaged their relationships with the United States. In the end, the British, French and Israeli governments withdrew their troops in late 1956 and early 1957. History changed on October 4, 1957, when the Soviet Union successfully launched Sputnik I. The world's first artificial satellite was about the size of a beach ball (58 cm.or 22.8 inches in diameter), weighed only 83.6 kg. or 183.9 pounds, and took about 98 minutes to orbit the Earth on its elliptical path. That launch ushered in new political, military, technological, and scientific developments. While the Sputnik launch was a single event, it marked the start of the space age and the U.S. - U.S.S.R space race. The Sputnik launch changed everything. As a technical achievement, Sputnik caught the world's attention and the American public off - guard. Its size was more impressive than Vanguard's intended 3.5 - pound payload. In addition, the public feared that the Soviets' ability to launch satellites also translated into the capability to launch ballistic missiles that could carry nuclear weapons from Europe to the U.S. Then the Soviets struck again; on No- vember 3, Sputnik II was launched, carrying a much heavier payload, including a dog named Laika. Immediately after the Sputnik I launch in October, the U.S. Defense Department responded to the political furor by approving funding for another U.S. satellite project. As a simultaneous alternative to Vanguard, Wernher von Braun and his Army Redstone Arse- nal team began work on the Explorer project. On November 10, 1958, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev delivered a speech in which he demanded that the Western powers of the United States, Great Britain and France pull their forces out of West Berlin within six months. This ultimatum sparked a three year crisis over the future of the city of Berlin that culminated in 1961 with the building of the Berlin Wall. The division of Germany and its capital city of Berlin

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