2.1.3 Slope.pdf - Name Period Date In Lesson 2.1.2 you used...

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Name: __________________________________________ Period: ______ Date: ____________ In Lesson 2.1.2, you used the horizontal and vertical distances of a slope triangle to measure the steepness of a line. Today you will use the idea of stairs to understand slope even better. You will review the difference between positive and negative slopes and will draw lines when given information about Δ x and Δ y . During the lesson, ask your teammates the following focus questions: x How can we tell if the slope is positive or negative? x What makes a line steeper? What makes a line less steep? x What does a line with a slope of zero look like? 2-23. One way to think about slope triangles is as stair steps on a line. a. Picture yourself climbing (or descending) the stairs from left to right on each of the lines on the graph (below, right). Of lines A, B, and C, which is the steepest? Which is the least steep? b. Examine line D. What direction is it slanting from left to right? What number should be used for Δ y to represent this direction? c. Look at the graph on the right and label the sides of a slope triangle on each line. Then determine the slope of each line. How does the slope relate to the steepness of the graph? Line Slope Steepness A B C D Downward from left to right
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d. Cora answered part (d) with the statement, “The steeper the line, the greater the slope.” Do you agree? If so, use lines A through D to support her statement. If not, change her statement to make it correct. 2-24. Use the graph shown at right to answer the questions. a. Which is the steepest line? Which is steeper, line B or line C? b. Draw slope triangles for lines A, B, C, D, and E using the highlighted points on each line. Label Δ x and Δ y for each.
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