White Paper final draft.docx

White Paper final draft.docx - Running head GOVERNMENT...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Running head: GOVERNMENT SURVEILLANCE AND PRIVACY Government Surveillance and the Fourth Amendment: Are Citizens’ Rights Being Violated? Kathryn Bylis Marquette University
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 GOVERNMENT SURVEILLANCE AND PRIVACY Abstract Government surveillance has long been used in order to keep potential threats at bay, or solve crimes but is this constitutional? The National Security Agency currently has access to almost all communications that take place over the internet, and most are collected without people even knowing. The laws governing surveillance in the US offer the government free reign to do what they would like concerning most surveillance. These surveillance techniques are a problem for American citizens because it violates their fourth amendment right to privacy, and the fourth amendment’s search and seizure clause. In order to fix this, laws increasing transparency must be passed, and current surveillance laws must be reformed to better protect privacy. If this problem is not fixed, the government will continue to violate the fourth amendment.
Image of page 2
2 GOVERNMENT SURVEILLANCE AND PRIVACY Introduction According to one survey, 74% of Americans surveyed stated that they believe the government should not give up citizens’ privacy just for the sake of safety; 54% disapprove of the United States’ collection of telephone and internet data as part of claimed anti-terrorism efforts (Esau, 2016, p. 70). So why is this still happening? The United States government currently has access to almost all of what citizens consider to be “private,” information. This includes a variety of information including: who you call and where from, emails, and messages sent on messaging apps like Facebook and WhatsApp (Rooney, 2017, p. 1629). This type of mass data collection is called metadata, and the amount of data collected each day is so massive it is impossible for a human being to analyze it all. Government surveillance has taken place since the early days of communication, and as technology grew, so did the government’s surveillance techniques. At first, the government established the National Security Agency to deal with radio communications concerning foreign intelligence after World War II. As technology grew to include things like cellphone and internet communications, surveillance became trickier as the government tried to approach this new technology. The current framework for surveillance in the US includes eavesdropping on phone calls, intercepting emails, and looking into online communications. Although some may say they have, “nothing to hide,” this type of data allows the NSA to develop a pattern of life for each person they surveil, innocent or not (Woodburn, 2013, p. 293). This type of surveillance up until recently was completely confidential, only those working for the National Security Agency or with high security clearance were aware of exactly what was going on. Whistleblowers, those who inform others on the illicit activities of a person or organization, have revealed the surveillance techniques used by the NSA. The most famous of
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern