Unit 3 Final.docx - Bylis 1 Kathryn Bylis Professor Kenney...

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Kathryn Bylis Professor Kenney English 1001 07 December 2017 Medicine and Psychology: A Comparison of Rhetoric In sports, performance matters greatly to athletes; it helps them win competitions, get awards, and get recognized by coaches. But, health contributes to performance, without good health athletes cannot perform well. In medical and psychology articles concerning health and how it contributes to performance, authors mask their real exigence of making athletes healthier under the guise that better performance is their goal. Authors do this in order to cater to an audience that is focused more on performance than health. The authors in both disciplines use pathos as their main appeal, using the common value of performance to persuade the audience to make athletes healthier, physically in the medical discipline and mentally in the psychology discipline. Three articles from the medical discipline, one of which will not be used, and two articles from the psychology discipline were assessed. For the first discipline, medicine, two articles, written by Chase et al. and Wolf et al. contained the methods, results, and analysis of studies they conducted concerning the amount of physical injuries sustained by swimmers. The rate of injury was measured by amount of injuries per 1,000 athletic exposures, with an athletic exposure being one competition or practice. Both studies used participants from Divison I NCAA swim teams. Another article written by Wanivenhaus et al. contained a survey of other studies concerning injuries in swimming and spoke on their significance. The article written by Wanivenhaus et al. proved to be an outlier concerning the topic of this essay and so will not be used. In the Bylis 1
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psychology discipline both Thanopoulus et al. and Nikeresht et al. conducted studies concerning the level of pre-competitive anxiety in swimmers. Participants in these studies filled out surveys with questions about their anxiety just prior to swimming in competition. In both of these disciplines, the health of the swimmers seems to be the main priority for the authors, but they appeal to their audience using performance. By using performance, the authors are able to make health important to their audience in a more subdued way by getting them to care about health through the way that health affects performance. This use of appeals points to a very performance-concerned audience. In both articles from the medical discipline, the authors establish pathos through the use of a common value and calls to action. Both authors show concern over the health of swimmers, but use the common value of performance to link health and performance, therefore getting a performance based audience to care about health. Chase et al. wrote on how injury hindered swimmers in their study’s performance stating, “Injury… resulted in the restriction of the student athlete’s performance.” (113). Wolf et al. also relates injury to performance stating, “Student-
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