US History Emancipation Proclamation Research Paper .pdf

US History Emancipation Proclamation Research Paper .pdf -...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 9 pages.

Determinations and Natural Occurrences:The Effect of the Emancipation Proclamation On the North US History
Image of page 1
1 Historians believe that the Civil War was caused by the failure of compromise between the North and South. The North fought to preserve the Union, while the South fought to preserve slavery. However, in the middle of the Civil War, 1863, Abraham Lincoln issued the 1 Emancipation Proclamation, which freed all slaves under rebellious state control and added another reason for fighting for the North. The Emancipation Proclamation affected the South because it took away many of their slaves, thus making them fight harder, but to what extent did the Emancipation Proclamation change the effort of the war for the North? The effect the Emancipation Proclamation had on the North and South was greatly related to how the Civil War changed after its issuing. While the South was greatly affected by the Proclamation due to the risk of losing their major working force, the North was also affected due to an army that freed slaves had joined, help from other countries because of the North’s attitude against slavery, and the increase in motivation from the greater probability of winning the Civil War. The advantage that the Proclamation created proved that the Emancipation Proclamation did more than just free slaves under Confederate control. Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation took away a large portion of the South’s slaves. The Emancipation Proclamation states, “I do order and declare that all persons held as 1 Lincoln, Abraham. Letter from President Abraham Lincoln to Horace Greeley . Washington, D.C., United States: n.p, 22 Aug. 1862. Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History (accessed October 24, 2016). pe=SingleTab&searchType=ts&userGroupName=cupe17751&prodId=SMPS&asid=d85045489 9e0d023394374d8535a2b85 .
Image of page 2
2 slaves within said designated States and parts of States are, and henceforward shall be, free.” 2 This statement freed all slaves in ten states of the Confederacy. Although the Proclamation did not free all slaves, it posed a great threat to the South because the main working force in the South consisted of slaves, and that working force was by the Proclamation. It was threatening to the South to lose their slaves, but it was more threatening to have those slaves fight against them in the Union’s army. The Proclamation also states, such persons of suitable condition will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service. 3 After the slaves from the Confederacy were freed, they had the option to join the Union’s army. This option was taken by many of the freed slaves because they wanted to fight against the South, to fight against slavery.
Image of page 3

Want to read all 9 pages?

Image of page 4

Want to read all 9 pages?

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 9 pages?

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern