Esquith_on_Mill - J.S Mill The Subjection of Women(1869...

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J.S. Mill, The Subjection of Women (1869) Moral Concepts and Ethical Ideals 2 Problems: doctrine of spousal unity the slavery analogy 3 arguments, objections, and counter-arguments An appeal to intuition 2 Criticisms: inconsistency narrowness The Dilemma of Liberty and Security
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Liberty “…liberty of expressing and publishing opinions…tastes and pursuits…planning our own life to suit our own character… freedom to unite…not involving harm to others.” ( OL , 18)
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Equality “The equality of married persons before the law, is not only the sole mode in which that particular relations can be made consistent with justice to both sides, and conducive to the happiness of both, but it is the only means of rendering the daily life of mankind, in any high sense, a school of moral cultivation.” ( SW , 179)
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Utility “It is proper to state that I forgo any advantage which could be derived to my argument from the idea of abstract right, as a thing independent of utility. I regard utility as the ultimate appeal on all ethical questions, but it must be utility in the largest sense, grounded in the permanent interests of man as a progressive being .” ( OL , 17)
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The Ideal of a Person “He who lets the world, or his own portion of it, choose his plan of life for him, has no need of any other faculty than the ape-like one of imitation. He who chooses his plan for himself, employs all his faculties. He must use observation to see, reasoning and judgment to foresee, activity to gather materials for decision. Discrimination to decide, and when he has decided, firmness and self- control to hold his deliberate decision.” ( OL , 67) “A people, it appears, may be progressive for a certain length of time, and then stop: when does it stop? When it ceases to possess individuality.” ( OL , 80)
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This note was uploaded on 03/23/2008 for the course MC 201 taught by Professor Lynnscott during the Fall '08 term at Michigan State University.

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Esquith_on_Mill - J.S Mill The Subjection of Women(1869...

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