Comparative Essay.docx - Silvestri 1 Steven...

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Silvestri 1 Steven Silvestri (111398078) WRT 102.77 Comparative Essay October 10th, 2017 Cat in the Rain & Hills Like White Elephants Ernest Hemingway has a tendency to write narratives that seem simple at first glance, yet, when in reality contain a meaning that is deeper and more complicated than appearance. It is as if Hemingway designed his narratives to have characteristics similar to a jawbreaker. At first, Hemingway’s narratives seem to be simple and bland like the outer white layer of a jawbreaker. Yet, when further dissected by the reader, the other layers become apparent as they become revealed. And unlike the bland outer white layer of a jawbreaker, the inner layers are composed of different colors; the different colors each holding a different aspect to the meaning of the story. The effect of this is that the meaning is not apparent at first, causing the reader to look elsewhere for clues as to what the actual meaning might be. This style of writing by Hemingway is displayed to a full extent in his short narratives, “Cat in the Rain” and “Hills Like White Elephants.” When first read, both narratives seem like simple stories that a child could scrap up for their classroom creative writing assignment. Yet, when further analyzed,
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Silvestri 2 both narratives hold the characteristics of the jawbreaker example described earlier. As a means to assisting this style of writing, setting and dialogue are both used prevalently in both of these pieces. Therefore, it can be stated that the setting and dialogue help provide a deeper meaning. Most notable in assisting this style of writing in “Cat in the Rain” and “Hills Like White Elephants” is the way the author incorporates the setting. Appearing in the first paragraph of both narratives, the setting is used as the basis for a deeper understanding. In “Cat in the Rain,” Hemingway uses the setting in order to create a scenery in which he can vividly paint his characters as well as reflect and explain their characteristics: that is, how the characters act and feel. On the other hand, in “Hills Like White Elephants,” Ernest Hemingway uses the setting as an introduction to an obscure and unidentified conflict between the two characters. In both narratives, it is as if the author encrypted the meaning of his story and the setting acts as a the key to decrypt the meaning.
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