lect03-unity.pdf - CMSC 425 Dave Mount Roger Eastman CMSC 425 Lecture 3 Introduction to Unity Reading For further information about Unity see the online

lect03-unity.pdf - CMSC 425 Dave Mount Roger Eastman CMSC...

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CMSC 425Dave Mount & Roger EastmanCMSC 425: Lecture 3Introduction to UnityReading:For further information about Unity, see the online documentation, which can be foundat. The material on Unity scripts is largely based on lecturenotes by Diego Perez from the University of Essex,. Notethat we will only have time to cover part of this in class, but please read theentire lecture. Also,visit the many good tutorials provided by Unity on the Internet.Unity:Unity3D is a widely-used cross-platform game develop system. It consists of a game engineand an integrated development environment (IDE). It can be used to develop games for manydifferent platforms, including PCs, consoles, mobile devices, and deployment on the Web. Inthis lecture, we will present the basic elements of Unity. However, this is a complex system,and we will not have time to delve into its many features. A good starting point for learningabout Unity is to try the many tutorials available on the Unity Tutorial Web site.Unity Basic Concepts:The fundamental structures that make up Unity are the same as in mostgame engines. As with any system, there are elements and organizational features that areunique to this particular system.Project:Theprojectcontains all the elements that makes up the game, including models,assets, scripts, scenes, and so on.Projects are organized hierarchically in the samemanner as a file-system’s folder structure.Scenes:Ascenecontains a collection of game objects that constitute the world that theplayer sees at any time.A game generally will contain many scenes.For example,different levels of a game would be stored as different scenes.Also, special screens(e.g., an introductory screen), would be modeled as scenes that essentially have only atwo-dimensional content.Packages:Apackageis an aggregation of game objects and their associated meta-data.Think of a package in the same way as library packages in Java.They are relatedobjects (models, scripts, materials, etc.). Here are some examples:a collection of shaders for rendering water effectsparticle systems for creating explosionsmodels of race cars for a racing gamemodels of trees and bushes to create a woodland sceneUnity provides a number standard packages for free, and when a new project is created,you can select the packages that you would like to have imported into your project.Prefabs:Aprefabis a template for grouping various assets under a single header. Prefabsare used for creating multiple instances of a common object. Prefabs are used in twocommon ways. First, in designing a level for your game you may have a large number ofcopies of a single element (e.g., street lights). Once designed, a street light prefab canbe instantiated and placed in various parts of the scene. If you decide to want to changethe intensity of light for all the street lights, you can modify the prefab, and this willcause all the instances to change. A second use is to generate dynamic game objects.
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