HIS 200 Final Writing Plan.docx - Dawn MacDonald HIS 200 Applied History Southern New Hampshire University May 5 2018 Preliminary Writing Plan For my

HIS 200 Final Writing Plan.docx - Dawn MacDonald HIS 200...

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Dawn MacDonald HIS 200: Applied History Southern New Hampshire University May 5, 2018 Preliminary Writing Plan For my historical event analysis, I chose to focus on the atomic bombing in 1945 on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which ended up affected history for many years to come. The United States changed history forever when they decided to take the WWII into their own hands by using the first ever atomic bombs. The first bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan on August 6 th , 1845, and days later the second bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan. These two bombs killed over 80,000 people but as months and years passed hundreds if thousand died from the deadly effects of the bombs. One of the known controversy is whether the medical effects of the bomb were known prior to the actual bombing. Some say many scientists and researchers were aware of the havoc the bombs would have for many years to come while other were accused of turning a blind eye. Not only did research prove the bombings had devastating immediate effects on the civilians both physically and socially, but the bombings also had many long lasting effects on and their lineages for years to come. In examining the events that built up to the decision of releasing the atomic bombs, I will try to prove how damaging this decision was to the areas of attack, their surrounding locations, and the people of Japan. Specifically, I will try to answer the following research question: What were the physical and social effects of the atomic bomb on Japanese civilians in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945?
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The debate over whether the physical effects of the radiation from the bombs were known prior to the decision of releasing the atomic bombs is one that is still discussed today. With the number of deaths that were initially calculated right after the bombings and other deaths that occurred months and years after the bombing, it was clearly a steep price to pay for the end of a war. Japanese civilians suffered physical, medical and psychological effects for years to come.
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