Psci 203 test 1.docx - Looks like the whole gang's here...

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. Looks like the whole gang's here. LETS ACE THIS SHITTT LOL Gang gang gang Intro to American Government Study Guide for Exam 1 Please bring a blue scantron sheet Heres a quizlet i found (kind of helps)- - 203-csusb-conroy-flash-cards/ Here's a quizlet for the 3 quizzes in a quizlet - midterm-flash-cards/ Topics under examination: Foundations of American Government, The Constitution and Federalism, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties Terms you should know: Foundations of American Government - Types Democratic systems Direct democracy: A form of government, originally found in ancient Greece, in which the people directly pass laws and make other key decisions Representative democracy/Republic: Is a type of democracy founded on the principle of elected officials representing a group of people, as opposed to direct democracy. Systems of Government Unitary: A unitary state is a state governed as a single power in which the central government is ultimately supreme and any administrative divisions (sub-national units) exercise only the powers that the central government chooses to delegate. Confederate: Whereas a federation has a strong central government, a confederation is more of an agreement between separate bodies to cooperate with each other. Federalism: Is a system of government in which entities such as states or provinces share power with a national government. Reserved powers (states): The Tenth Amendment declares, "The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people." In other words, states have all powers not granted to the federal government bojy the Constitution. Expressed powers (central govt/federal gov) : powers that are presented in the constitution directed by congress Concurrent powers (states and federal gov): Powers in nations with a federal system of government that are shared by both the federal government and each constituent political unit (such as a state or province). Marble cake federalism/cooperative federalism- State and federal share power; lots of interaction between
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levels of government (1937-now) Layer cake federalism/dual federalism- splitting up the power; no interactions between levels of government. No shared power. National & state (1789-1937) The American Revolution Two causes: The British government decided to make the American colonies pay a large share of the war debt from the French and Indian War. Through the Sugar Act, Stamp Act, and other taxes, the British tried to collect taxes that the American people considered harsh Financial: Colonists were being “squeezed” (taxation without representation) i.e. tea act, sugar act, etc.
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