Lecture6_SP08 - equipotential surfaces! Electric field...

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Topics to be covered in class: Review: electrostatic potential How do we calculate electrostatic potential from the electrostatic field? Equipotential surfaces Example: electrostatic potential due to continuous charge distribution How do we calculate electric field from electric potential? Independent reading: Energy of system of charges
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A particle with mass m and, charge –q is projected with speed v 0 into the region between two parallel plates as shown. The potential difference between the two plates is V and their separation is d. The change in kinetic energy of the particle as it traverses this region is: A) –qV/d B) 2qV/mv 0 2 C) qV D) mv 0 2 E) none of these
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Calculating potential from electric field
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Calculating potential from electric field
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Find: V P , V 2 (on the outer shell), V 1 (on the inner shell)
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Find: V P , V 2 (on the outer shell), V 1 (on the inner shell)
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Equipotential surfaces
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Equipotential surfaces Electric field lines go from positive to negative
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Unformatted text preview: equipotential surfaces! Electric field lines are always perpendicular to the equipotential surfaces! An electron goes from one equipotential surface to another along one of the four paths shown below. Rank the paths according to the work done by the electric field, from least to greatest. A) 1, 2, 3, 4 B) 4, 3, 2, 1 C) 1, 3, 4 and 2 tie D) 4 and 2 tie, then 3, then 1 E) 4, 3, 1, 2 Calculating electric field from the potential! The electric field in a region around the origin is given by ) ( yj i x C E + = r r where C is a constant. The equipotential surfaces are: A) concentric cylinders with axes along the z axis B) concentric cylinders with axes along the x axis C) concentric spheres centered at the origin D) planes parallel to the xy plane E) planes parallel to the yz plane Electric potential by a continuous charge distribution: thin charged disk...
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2008 for the course PHY 303L taught by Professor Turner during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Lecture6_SP08 - equipotential surfaces! Electric field...

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