syllabus 150B.pdf - 1 2 History 150B M158B African American History 1600-1865 Winter Quarter 2018 B Stevenson Ph.D Nickoll Family Endowed Chair and

syllabus 150B.pdf - 1 2 History 150B M158B African American...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 2 History 150B, M158B African American History 1600-­‐1865, Winter Quarter 2018 B. Stevenson, Ph.D., Nickoll Family Endowed Chair and Professor of History; Professor of African American Studies Phone: x5940; Email: [email protected] Class Meetings: TTh 8:00 AM -­‐9:15 AM, Fowler A139 Office Hours: 9:00AM-­‐Noon W in 6274 Bunche Hall Course Description: This course is a survey of the history and experiences (social, legal, economic, cultural and political) of African and persons of African descent who came to reside in British North American (later the United States) from the period 1600 to 1860. The course will flow primarily in a chronological fashion, beginning with the African slave trade and then moving on to colonial settlement, the development of slave societies, the American revolution, the move westward, antebellum America, reform efforts of the early 19th century, particularly abolition, and the era just before the Civil War begins. Topics of particular interest will be gender, slave labor, family relations, culture, resistance and community as well as the lives of free people of color both in the North, South and West and the abolitionist movement. There also will be some comparative descriptions of the lives of North American blacks and those of the Atlantic diaspora (especially the Caribbean and South America). Course Requirements: 1. Class attendance . Please note: Class roll will be recorded at each class meeting. Attendance is 10 percent of your final grade. 2. Midterm: 45% of final grade Please note: The midterms will be in essay and short answer format. Anyone not present at the time of the midterm must have a written, documented excuse in order to take a make-­‐up exam. If you do not have such an excuse, you will receive a grade of 0 on the unexcused missed exam. Make-­‐up exams must be taken within the week of the missed exam. Any student with a CAE accommodation for exam time extension must provide verification of this accommodation at least 2 weeks before the scheduled exam. Extended time exams should be arranged to be taken in a space provided by CAE. 3. Final Paper: 45 % of Final Grade; 10 pages in length. This is a formal writing, research centered assignment. The 10-­‐page length is minimal and does not include title page, endnotes, or bibliography. No quotes longer than 2 typed sentences are allowed. Refer to Chicago Manual of Style for questions regarding formal writing style for the discipline of history. MLA style is not allowed and will result in grade penalty. Late papers will be deducted 5 points per each day late. The topic for the paper will be announced in class on January 11th. All papers will be submitted via Turnitin.com. Reading List and Reading Assignments: Books are available in Ackerman, campus libraries (but are not on reserve) or purchase at other book stores or online. 3 Kindle and ebooks are acceptable. Computers, Tablets, smart phones: You are required to have access to online materials in class. Please make certain that you have either a computer, tablet or smart phone with you during each class period. Any of these items used within the class for non-­‐class assignments, however, will result in a 5-­‐point deduction of your final grade each time you are found in violation of this rule. Required Reading: 1. Brenda Stevenson, What Is Slavery? 2. Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, Slavery and African Ethnicities in the Americas: Restoring the Links 3. Wendy Warren, New England Bound 4. Colson Whitehead, Underground Railroad 5. Black British Former Slaves: Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, Ottobah Cugoano. These narratives are found at: . 6. William Still, Underground Railroad 7. Occasional online readings assigned in class or for the following class Weekly Reading and Other Assignments Schedule: 1. Week One: What is Slavery, Chapter One 2. Week Two: What is Slavery, Chapter Two; Hall, Slavery and African Ethnicities, Chapters 1-­‐3 3. Week Three: What is Slavery, Chapter Three; Warren, New England Bound, Part One 4. Week Four: Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, Ottobah Cugoano. 5. Week Five: What is Slavery, Chapter Four 6. Week Six: : Midterm Examination On Thursday 2/15/18, No reading 7. Week Seven: Colson White Head, Underground Railroad 8. Week Eight: William Still, Underground Railroad 9. Week Nine: William Still, Underground Railroad 10. Week Ten: Paper due on Thursday 3/15/18; no reading Class Rules: 1. Class attendance is mandatory. 2. Class lectures or discussions are not to be recorded except by hand\ or typed. Photography, taping, or filming is not allowed in class. 3. All work must be created by the student who is to receive credit for it in this class during this quarter. 4 ...
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  • Spring '18
  • stevenson
  • History, professor  of  history

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