assignment one.docx - Unit Activity Unit The Romantic Era...

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© 2014 EDMENTUM, INC. Unit Activity Unit: The Romantic Era This activity will help you meet these educational goals: Common Core State Standards— You will write arguments to support claims, using sound reasoning and evidence (W.1); produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience (W.4); develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, adapting to a specific purpose and audience (W.5); draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research (W.9); and cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as implicitly (RL.1). Introduction In this unit activity, you will analyze the elements of romantic poetry, evaluate and revise your essay using a checklist, and evaluate your revisions. ________________________________________________________________________ Directions and Analysis Task: Analyzing Romantic Poetry In this task, you will closely examine a poem from the romantic period. You will then write an essay that explains the poem by presenting a claim about it and providing an argument to support the claim. Your essay will also include an analysis of how specific elements affect the poem as a whole. 1. Choose a poem by any one of the following poets: Thomas Gray William Blake William Wordsworth Samuel Taylor Coleridge Lord Byron Percy Bysshe Shelley John Keats Below are some suggested poems for this activity: " The World Is Too Much with Us " by William Wordsworth " Mutability " by Percy Bysshe Shelley " This Living Hand " by John Keats " Work Without Hope " by Samuel Taylor Coleridge However, if you prefer to work on a different poem, it's a good idea to read through the entire instructions for this activity first to ensure that you choose a poem that is appropriate in length and complexity for the essay you'll be submitting. 1
2. Once you have chosen a poem, read it carefully and think about these specific elements: theme or central idea figurative language and other poetic devices tone structure or organization (including rhyme scheme, meter, and stanza structure) 3. After you have read the poem thoroughly, present your analysis of the poem in an essay. Think of a major claim that you can make about the poem and build an argument to support that claim using evidence from the text. (An essay that contains such an argument is called an explication of a poem.) Your claim may be a specific interpretation of the poem, a view about the poet's attitude toward the subject, the relationship of the subject to the historical context of the poem, the significance of some element of the poem's form, and so on.

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