FMFQO_Study_Guide.pdf - PERSONNEL QUALIFICATION STANDARD(PQS FOR FLEET MARINE FORCE QUALIFIED OFFICER(FMFQO STUDY GUIDE NAME(Rate\/Rank History

FMFQO_Study_Guide.pdf - PERSONNEL QUALIFICATION...

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Unformatted text preview: PERSONNEL QUALIFICATION STANDARD (PQS) FOR FLEET MARINE FORCE QUALIFIED OFFICER (FMFQO) STUDY GUIDE NAME (Rate/Rank) __________________________ History & Significance of the FMFQO Device The Eagle, Globe and Anchor (EGA - Marine Corps Emblem) is centered on the breast insignia as the capture of the device, making a clear statement that the wearer is a member of the Navy/Marine Corps team. Background - At the time the advice was designed, Forward… From the Sea was the Navy and Marine Corps joint vision for the future. This is represented in the background of the device; a surf wave crashing on the sandy beach (the littoral zone), the place where Sailors have served alongside Marines as the earned their reputation, “on the shores of Tripoli” and the “sands of Iwo Jima”. The littoral (or coastal) regions of the world are also where the Navy and Marine Corps team will exert the U.S. Interests in future conflicts as reflected in the doctrine of the time, “Operational Maneuver from the Sea”. Crossed Rifles - Warfare programs have served the purpose of installing warrior ethos in Sailors as well as enhancing mission effectiveness in both individual and unit survivability since their inception. On ships and submarines, every Sailor is trained as a firefighter and damage control man to fight and save the ship in an emergency. With the Marines, it is essential in combat for every person to have the knowledge and skill of a rifleman, if the unit is to survive. The two crossed rifles symbolize the rifleman ethic this program is designated to install in Sailors assigned to the Marines. Scroll - The scroll along the bottom of the breast insignia is emblazoned with “Fleet Marine Force” Although Marine componency was established in 1982, significantly changing the operational environment in which Marine Corps forces deploy and operate in a joint environment. The Navy continues to utilize the title Fleet Marine Force in their role as a Naval Type Commander, therefore since programs are a distinct part of Navy culture, it is appropriate our program be titled after the role in which Marine Forces are tied to the Navy. I TABLE OF CONTENTS Page History & Significance of the FMFQO Device…………………………….I ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS…………………………………………….......III 101 Navy and Marine Corps History, Customs, and Courtesies…………...101-1 102 United States Marine Corps (USMC) Mission and Organization……..102-1 103 Safety ………………………………………………………………….103-1 104 Administrative ………………………………………………………...104-1 105 Air Combat Element (ACE)…………………………………………...105-1 106 Ground Combat Element (GCE)………………………………………106-1 107 Logistics Combat Element (LCE)……………………………………..107-1 108 Command Element (CE)………………………………………………108-1 109 Amphibious Operations……………………………………………….109-1 110 Force Protection……………………………………………………….110-1 111 General Combat Leadership……………………………………….….111-1 112 United States Marine Corps (USMC) Operations…………………….112-1 113 Environmental Awareness…………………………………………….113-1 114 Communications……………………………………………………....114-1 115 Weapons………………………………………………………………115-1 116 Tactical Measures……………………………………………………..116-1 117 Land Navigation………………………………………………………117-1 II ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The I MEF FMFQO Coordinator gratefully acknowledges the assistance of the following personnel in writing this study guide: LCDR Bill Miles CDR Paul Hammer CAPT Daniel Zinder CAPT Mark Doherty LtCol Mike “Moose” Evans Capt Kristy McCutchan 1st Lt Phillip Tracy Maj Matt Seay I MEF Medical Planner, Camp Pendleton 1st MARDIV Psychiatrist, Camp Pendleton I MEF (FWD) Force Surgeon, Camp Pendleton I MEF (Rear) Force Surgeon, Camp Pendleton I MEF, G3 Assist. Air Off, Camp Pendleton Truck Co., I MHG, Camp Pendleton 9th Comm BN, I MHG, Camp Pendleton 1st MLG, Camp Pendleton Although the words “he”, “him,” and “his” are used sparingly in this manual to enhance communication, they are not intended to be gender driven nor to affront or discriminate against anyone reading this material III This page was intentionally left blank IV Marine Corps History, Customs and Courtesies 101 101 NAVY AND MARINE CORPS HISTORY, CUSTOMS, AND COURTESIES FUNDAMENTALS References a. Naval Doctrine Publication 1, Naval Warfare (PCN 0700LP0099550) b. Marine Corps Common Skills Handbook, Book 1A, All Marines, Individual Training Standards, May 2001(PCN 50600000900) c. MCO P1020-34, Marine Corp Uniform Regulations 101.1 State the six areas of naval doctrine. • • • • • • NDP 1, Naval Warfare, describes the inherent nature and enduring principles of naval forces. NDP 2, Naval Intelligence, points the way for intelligence support in meeting the requirements of both regional conflicts and operations other than war. NDP 3, Naval Operations, develops doctrine to reaffirm the foundation of U.S. Navy and Marine Corps expeditionary maritime traditions. NDP 4, Naval Logistics, addresses the full range of logistical capabilities that are essential in the support of naval forces. NDP 5, Naval Planning, examines planning and the relationship between our capabilities and operational planning in the joint and multinational environment. NDP 6, Naval Command and Control, provides the basic concepts to fulfill the information needs of commanders, forces, and weapon systems. 101.2 Discuss the origin of the Marine Corps. The Marine Corps was created on 10 Nov, 1775 in Philadelphia at Tun Tavern, by a resolution of the Continental Congress, which “raised two battalions of Marines.” 101.3 Explain the Marine Corps motto, Semper Fidelis. The official motto for the Marine Corps, “Semper Fidelis,” is Latin for “Always Faithful.” The motto, sometimes abbreviated, “Semper Fi,” was adopted about 1883. 101-1 101 Marine Corps History, Customs and Courtesies 101.4 Describe the Marine Corps emblem and state its significance. The Marine Corps emblem is the Eagle, Globe and Anchor, often shortened to the "Globe and Anchor", or EGA. Adopted in its present form in 1868, it derives partially from ornaments worn by the Continental Marines and the British Royal Marines, and is usually topped with a ribbon reading "Semper Fidelis". The eagle stands for a proud country, the globe signifies global service, and the fouled anchor signifies maritime traditions. The eagle is a crested eagle found worldwide, not the bald eagle that appears in other American symbols and is native to North America. The eagle is standing on the western hemisphere and is a holding a scroll with the Marine Corps motto, Semper Fidelis, on it. 101.5 Explain the following terms/phrases used throughout the Marine Corps: Leatherneck - This nickname dates back to the leather stock, or neckpiece worn as part of the Marine Uniform during the years of 1775-1875. Utilized to protect the neck from saber slashes, the leather bands around their throats had a side effect of ensured that Marines kept their heads erect. Devil dog - In 1918, during the battle of Belleau Wood near the Marne River in France, the Germans received a thorough indoctrination on the Marines fighting ability. The Marines persistent attack had the Germans calling them “Teufelhunden” translated “Devil Dogs.” Esprit de corps - This implies devotion and loyalty to the Marine Corps, with deep regard for its history, traditions and honor. It is the epitome of pride in a unit. Uncommon valor was a common virtue - Refers to largest of all-Marine battles in history. Admiral Nimitz applied the Marines’ fighting ability on Iwo Jima to the entire Corps’ contribution during that war, stating, “Uncommon valor was a common virtue.” 101-2 Marine Corps History, Customs and Courtesies 101 First to fight - Marines have been in the forefront of every American war since the founding of the Marine Corps. They entered the Revolution in 1775, just before the Declaration of Independence was signed. They have carried out more than 300 landings on foreign shores. They have served everywhere, from the poles to the tropics. Their record of readiness reflects pride, responsibility and challenge. 101.6 Discuss Marine Corps rank and pay grade in order of seniority from E-1 to O-10. Enlisted Rank Structure: Private E-1 No Chevron Private First Class E-2 Lance Corporal E-3 Corporal E-4 Sergeant E-5 Staff Sergeant E-6 Gunnery Sergeant E-7 Master Sergeant/ First Sergeant E-8 Master Gunnery Sergeant E-9 Sergeant Major Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps E-9 101-3 101 Marine Corps History, Customs and Courtesies Warrant Officer Rank Structure: Warrant Officer W-1 2 Red/ 1Gold Chief Warrant Officer 2 W-2 3 Red/ 2Gold Chief Warrant Officer 3 W-3 2 Red/ 1 Silver Chief Warrant Officer 4 W-4 3 Red/ 1 Silver Chief Warrant Officer 5 W-5 1 Red / Silver Officer Rank Structure: Second Lieutenant O-1 Gold First Lieutenant O-2 Silver Captain O-3 Major O-4 Gold Lieutenant Colonel O-5 Silver Colonel O-6 Brigadier General O-7 Major General O-8 Lieutenant General O-9 General O-10 101-4 Marine Corps History, Customs and Courtesies 101 101.7 Discuss the general concepts for a company level formation. • A company consists of the company headquarters and two or more platoons. • For close order drill and ceremonies, company headquarters personnel may be attached to platoons without interfering with the permanent squad organization and that for marches, members of the company headquarters command group are formed as the company or as higher authority directs. • The company uses formations such as line, column, (of threes, etc.) mass, extended mass, and column of platoons in line. o Note: In all these formations, the platoons that comprise the company will either be in line (each squad forming one rank) or in column (each squad forming one file). The company may also form a column of two’s or files in a manner similar to that of a platoon. In this case, the platoons are arranged in the same manner as a company in column, except that each platoon is in a column of two’s or files. • When the company commander is absent, the senior officer present with the company takes post and drills the company for the company commander and that in the absence of the First Sergeant, the senior SNCO, normally a Gunnery Sergeant, takes post and performs the duties of the First Sergeant. 101-5 101 Marine Corps History, Customs and Courtesies • For drills and ceremonies, the guidon bearer carries the company guidon and that in all formations, the guidon bearer is one pace to the rear and one pace to the left of the company commander or the First Sergeant, and for marches in the field, the guidon is kept with the company headquarters baggage unless otherwise directed. o Note: If a guidon is carried in the field on marches the guidon bearer takes his post as described above for drills and ceremonies. 101.8 Discuss the procedures for conducting a personnel inspection. • Conduct a personnel inspection • Note all discrepancies as necessary • Determine corrective actions as necessary • Report all discrepancies to appropriate personnel. 101-6 Marine Corps History, Customs and Courtesies 101 101.9 Discuss the following Marine Corps service uniforms and their Navy equivalents: Service Alpha Navy equivalent = Service Dress Blue / Service Dress White The service "A" uniform may be prescribed for parades, ceremonies, social events, and as the uniform of the day. It will normally be worn when reporting for duty, unless otherwise prescribed by the commander. The service "A" uniform will be prescribed for the following official military occasions: • When assigned as a member of courts-marital or courts of inquiry. • Official visits and calls of, or to, United States civil officials, officers of the United States Armed Forces, and officials/officers of foreign governments per chapter 12, U.S. Navy Regulations. • When visiting the White House and the temporary White Houses at all times, except in a tourist capacity or when an individual is specifically invited either on a social or official occasion for which another uniform is indicated on the invitation. 101-7 101 Marine Corps History, Customs and Courtesies Service Bravo Navy equivalent = Winter Blue The service "B" uniform (with long sleeve shirt and tie) is the same as the service "A" uniform except that the service coat is not worn. This uniform may be worn as the uniform of the day and for leave and liberty, unless otherwise prescribed by the commander, and may be prescribed for formations at parades or ceremonies on and off the military activity. This uniform will not be worn for formal or semi-formal social events. Service Charlie 101-8 Marine Corps History, Customs and Courtesies 101 Navy equivalent = Summer Khaki / Summer White The short sleeve khaki shirt with appropriate service trousers or skirt/slacks is designated as the service "C" uniform. During the winter season, commanders may, at their discretion, when the weather requires, authorize the service "C" uniform. This uniform may be worn as a uniform of the day and for leave or liberty, unless otherwise prescribed by the commander, and may be prescribed for formations at parades or ceremonies on and off the military activity. This uniform will not be worn for formal or semiformal social events. NOTES: The service sweater may be worn at the individual's option as a component of the service "B"/"C" uniforms worn as the uniform of the day, unless the commander determines that the service "A" uniform is more appropriate. Commanders may prescribe the service uniform with sweater for inspections; however, this uniform will not be worn for ceremonial formations or parades on or off the military installation. The service uniform with sweater may be worn on leave or liberty. Female Marine may wear slacks as part of the service "A", "B," or "C" uniforms per paragraph 3026. Individual may wear either the all-season polyester/wool gabardine uniform or the phase-out summer and winter weight service uniforms on a year-round basis for all formations and for duty, leave, or liberty at the individual's option. Camouflage Utilities Navy equivalent = Winter Working Blue/Working Khaki The camouflage utility uniform is not authorized for wear except when in the field, for field-type exercises, or for those work conditions where it is not practical to wear the service uniform. When the camouflage utility uniform is prescribed as the working 101-9 101 Marine Corps History, Customs and Courtesies uniform Marines may wear it to and from their domicile, unless otherwise prohibited by the commander. Commanders may authorize the wear of the utility uniform for brief and appropriate stops off-base during duty hours or while commuting. Defining appropriate and necessary is a command responsibility requiring the exercise of sound judgment and common sense. Preventing abuse of the privilege demands that commanders know where their Marines are during to ensure that stops are in fact brief, appropriate and in keeping with the spirit of regulations. In no case will the utility uniform be treated or regarded as a leave or liberty uniform except when prescribed by commanders to meet special (normally overseas/deployed/etc.) requirements to include certain emergency leave situations. 101-10 USMC Mission and Organization 102 102 UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS (USMC) MISSION AND ORGANIZATION FUNDAMENTALS References: a. Marine Corps Common Skills Handbook, Book 1A, All Marines, Individual Training Standards, May 2001 b. Marine Corps Official Web Site ( ) c. Marine Corps Combat Development Command Official Web Site ( ) d. Marine Corps Systems Command Official Web Site ( ) e. NWP 3-02.3/MCWP 3.32, Maritime Prepositioning Forces Operations f. MCRP 5-12D, Organization of the Marine Corps Forces (PCN 14400005000) g. MCWP 5-1, Marine Corps Planning Process 102.1 State the mission and function of the Marine Corps. The official mission of the Marine Corps established in the 1952 Amendment to the National Security Act of 1947: “Marines are trained, organized, and equipped for offensive amphibious employment and as a force of readiness.” According to the Act, Marines stand prepared to meet mission requirements: • • • • • • • Provide Fleet marine Forces with combined arms and supporting air components for service with the United States Fleet in the seizure or defense of advanced naval bases and for the conduct of such land operations as may be essential to the execution of a naval campaign. Provide detachments and organizations for service on armed vessels of the Navy and security detachments for the protection of naval property at naval stations and bases. Develop, in coordination with the Army, Navy, and Air Force, the doctrine, tactics, techniques, and equipment employed by landing forces in amphibious operations. Provide marine forces for airborne operations, in coordination with the Army, Navy, and Air Force, according to the doctrine established by the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Develop, in coordination with the Army, Navy, and Air Force, the doctrine, tactics, techniques, and equipment for airborne operations. Expand peacetime components to meet wartime needs according to the joint mobilization plans. Perform such other duties as the President may direct. 102-1 102 USMC Mission and Organization 102.2 State the mission and function of the following: Headquarters Marine Corps (HQMC) Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps, consists of the Commandant of the Marine Corps and those staff agencies that advise and assist the Commandant in discharging those responsibilities prescribed by law and higher authority as describe below in US CODE TITLE 10. Per TITLE 10 - ARMED FORCES, Subtitle C - Navy and Marine Corps PART I – ORGANIZATION, CHAPTER 506 - HEADQUARTERS, MARINE CORPS, HEAD Sec. 5041. Headquarters, Marine Corps: function; composition STATUTE1. There is in the executive part of the Department of the Navy a Headquarters, Marine Corps. The function of the Headquarters, Marine Corps, is to assist the Secretary of the Navy in carrying out his responsibilities. 2. The Headquarters, Marine Corps, is composed of the following: a) The Commandant of the Marine Corps. b) The Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps. c) The Deputy Commandants. d) Other members of the Navy and Marine Corps assigned or detailed to the Headquarters, Marine Corps. e) Civilian employees in the Department of the Navy assigned or detailed to the Headquarters, Marine Corps. f) Except as otherwise specifically prescribed by law, the Headquarters, Marine Corps, shall be organized in such manner, and its members shall perform such duties and have such titles, as the Secretary may prescribe. EXPCITE-TITLE 10 - ARMED FORCES Subtitle C - Navy and Marine Corps PART I – ORGANIZATION CHAPTER 506 - HEADQUARTERS, MARINE CORPS HEAD-Sec. 5042. Headquarters, Marine Corps: general duties STATUTE1. The Headquarters, Marine Corps, shall furnish professional assistance to the Secretary, the Under Secretary, and the Assistant Secretaries of the Navy and to the Commandant of the Marine Corps. 2. Under the authority, direction, and control of the Secretary of the Navy, the Headquarters, Marine Corps, shall – a) subject to subsections (c) and (d) of section 5014 of this title, prepare for such employment of the Marine Corps, and for such recruiting, organizing, supplying, equipping (including research and development), training, servicing, mobilizing, demobilizing, administering, and maintaining of the Marine 102-2 USMC Mission and Organization 102 b) c) d) e) Corps, as will assist in the execution of any power, duty, or function of the Secretary or the Commandant; investigate and report upon the efficiency of the Marine Corps and its preparation to support military operations by combatant commanders; prepare detailed instructions for the execution of approved plans and supervise the execution of those plans and instructions; as directed by the Secretary or the Commandant, coordinate the action of organizations of the Marine Corps; and perform such other duties, not otherwise assigned by law, as may be prescribed by the Secretary. HQMC Agencies i...
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