Introduction to Logic

Introduction to Logic - Introduction to Logic Introduction...

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Unformatted text preview: Introduction to Logic Introduction to Logic What is an argument? An argument is a connected series of statements intended to establish a proposition (Michael Palin) i.e. A bunch of statements: some of those sentences are meant as reasons to think one or more of the others is true Whether its an argument depends on the intention of the person making the statements The difference between a bad argument and something that isnt an argument is that persons intention What is an argument? An argument is different from the following things: Fighting Sets of statements of facts not intended to support each other Contradiction YES IT IS DIFFERENT FROM AN ARGUMENT! NO IT ISNT!! What goes into an argument? One or more sentence(s) that needs to be established the conclusion One or more sentence(s) that are meant as reasons to think the conclusion(s) are true. the premises a relationship between the premises and the conclusion that makes the premises count (or not count) as a reason to think the conclusion is true Some clues for identifying arguments One situation where youre probably hearing/reading an argument is where Its obvious the person speaking/writing is trying to get a point across; they are trying to get you to believe what they are saying is true, or to agree with them. Usually people do this by offering some reasons to think theyre right In which case the things theyre saying usually can be formally organized into an argument Some clues for identifying arguments Another way to identify an argument is to look for argument words Blah, blah and blah-dy blah, Therefore Blah and Blah Some clues for identifying arguments Another way to identify an argument is to look for argument words Since blah, blah and blah; I suppose blah must be true Some clues for identifying arguments Another way to identify an argument is to look for argument words Blah and Blah, so Blah Some clues for identifying arguments BEFORE THE PREMISES BEFORE THE CONCLUSION THEREFORE SO PROBABLY SINCE THEN BECAUSE THUS Which of the following are arguments? The Democratic party has a pro-choice platform. The Democratic party has a pro affirmative action platform Therefore, the Democratic party has a liberal platform. YES The Republican Party has a pro-life platform. The Republican Party has a tax-cutting platform. The Republican party candidate for president was George W Bush. NO If the Democrats win the election, there will be a tax increase because the Democrats will increase the amount of money spent on public programs. Public programs require the use of additional public resources. The use of additional public resources requires a tax increase....
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This homework help was uploaded on 03/21/2008 for the course PY 211 / 212 taught by Professor Chilton during the Spring '08 term at N.C. State.

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Introduction to Logic - Introduction to Logic Introduction...

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