Chapter 1 Notes.pdf

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Part 1: Defining the Manager’s Terrain Chapter 1: Introduction to Management and Organizations Who are Managers? In workplaces of all types (offices, restaurants, retail stores, factories…), managers must deal with new ways of organizing work. Organizations need managers more than ever in these uncertain, complex, and chaotic times. Gallup Organization has found that: The single most important variable in employee productivity and loyalty is not pay or benefits or workplace environment. It is the quality of the relationship between employees and their direct supervisors. Watson Wyatt Worldwide found that: The way a company manages its people can significantly affect its financial performance. In many organizations, the changing nature of work has blurred the distinction between managers and nonmanagerial employees (ex. Multitasking and cross-training). Managers were the organizational members authorized to tell others what to do and how to do it. Important role of multitasking: not only important to fill up occasional gaps ( such as in case of an employee’s absence) but also in terms of enriching and developing organizational expertise that in turn is more likely to produce effective managers. Manager: someone who coordinates and oversees the work of other people in order to accomplish organizational goals. A manager’s job is not about personal achievement - it’s helping others do their work. Coordinating the work of a departmental group Supervising a single person Coordinating the work activities of a team of people from different departments or people outside the organization Temporary employees Employees who work for the organization’s suppliers Managers may have work duties not related to coordinating and overseeing others’ work. In traditionally structured organizations, managers are often classified as first-line, middle, or top.
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First-line managers manage the work of nonmanagerial employees and typically are directly or indirectly involved with producing the organization’s products or servicing the organization’s customers: Supervisors/shift managers/district managers/department managers/office managers Middle managers are managers between the lowest and top levels of the organization who manage the work of first-line managers: regional managers/ project leader/store manager/division manager Top managers are managers at or near the upper levels of the organization structure who are responsible for making organization-wide decisions and establishing the goals and plans that affect the entire organization: executive vice president/president/managing director/chief operating officer/chief executive officer Not all organizations get work done using this traditional pyramid form. Some organizations are more loosely configure, with work being done by ever-changing teams of employees who move from one project to another as work demand arises.
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