FS 6.3 Notes.doc - Module 6 Lesson 3 Student Notes Document...

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Module 6 Lesson 3 Student Notes Document Forensic Science, NCVPS Complete the following prompts as you move through the notes presentation. You will submit these notes to your teacher in the course. Introduction: In your own words describe what this lesson is about. -This lesson will be about learning how to identify and analyze bloodstains in order to understand the story behind a crime scene. Standards… What are the standards that you will cover in this module? - Understand and apply appropriate forensic science techniques for crime scene investigation, focusing on the recognition, documentation, collection, and preservation of evidence. - Determine and use appropriate techniques to search crime scenes. - Find, collect, and document evidence - Use scientific knowledge and standard scientific techniques to analyze forensic evidence Key Terms… For each of the key terms, roll over the term to see the definition. Write the term that matches each definition below: (Terms are not in the same order as the key terms in the lesson.) Parent Drop A drop of blood from which a wave, cast-off, or satellite spatter originated from. Spatter That blood which has been dispersed as a result of force applied to a source of blood. Patterns produced are often characteristic of the nature of the forces which created them Angle of impact The acute angle formed between the direction of a blood drop and the plane of the surface it strikes. Projected Blood Spatter A bloodstain pattern that is produced by blood released under pressure as opposed to an impact, such as arterial spurting. Origin/Source The common point (area) in a three dimensional space to which the trajectories of several blood drops can be retraced. Passive Blood Stains Evidence that liquid blood has come into contact with a surface. Bloodstain drop(s) created or formed by the force of gravity acting on an injured body. Blood Spines The pointed or elongated stains which radiate away from the central area of a bloodstain Contact/Transfer blood stains A bloodstain pattern created when a wet, bloody surface comes in contact with a second surface. A recognizable image of all or portion of the original surface may be observed in the pattern. Results from objects coming in contact with existing bloodstains and leaving wipes, swipes, or pattern transfers behind such as a
bloody shoe print or a smear from a body being dragged.

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