zupi Ch 6 Outline notes .docx - Maren Bowers Chapter 6 outline notes 6.1 Intro Under our federal system of government states traditionally exercised

zupi Ch 6 Outline notes .docx - Maren Bowers Chapter 6...

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Maren Bowers Chapter 6 outline notes 6.1 Intro - Under our federal system of government, states traditionally exercised control over wildlife within their borders. - Concern over the dwindling population of once-common animals such as the gray wolf led Congress to pass the Endangered Species Act in 1973. - The return of wolves to Yellowstone Park triggered a storm of protest from nearby sheep and cattle ranchers. - the wolf population in Idaho and Montana had grown to the point at which the Fish and Wildlife Service agreed to return management of wolves back to state agencies by 2007 - This long and often-heated debate over who should manage the gray wolf is an example of the kinds of conflicts that can arise in a federal system of government. 6.2 The establishment of a federal system - The United States was the first nation-state founded with a federalist system of government. The constitutional division of powers - The U.S. Constitution divides powers into three categories: expressed, concurrent, and reserved. - Expressed powers : the powers given specifically to the national government by the U.S. Constitution; also known as enumerated or delegated powers - The Constitution says little about the powers reserved by states. But it does place some requirements on state governments. - The Tenth Amendment further clarifies the constitutional division of powers by declaring that powers not specifically delegated to the national government are reserved for the states. The benefit of a federal system - By dividing power among several units of government, federalism makes it difficult for a misguided majority to trample the rights of a minority. - As Goldberg's example suggests, federalism allows groups with different values and different ways of life to live together in peace. - The flexibility of federalism allows states to act as testing grounds for innovative solutions to common problems. - federalism provides an opportunity for people to be involved in the political process closer to home than the nation's capital.
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The drawbacks of a federal system - For all of the benefits, there are drawbacks to a federal system. One is the lack of consistency of laws and policies from state to state. - Another drawback of our federal system is the tension it sometimes creates between state and federal officials. 6.3 The evolution of federalism - There are approximately 88,000 national, state, and local units of government in the United States.
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  • Fall '16
  • Craig Zupi
  • Federalism, Local government in the United States

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