Summary - Chapter 19 (Mackie)

Summary - Chapter 19 (Mackie) - o Considerations that...

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Chapter 19 Summary J. L. Mackie: The Subjectivity of Values According to Mackie, the world does not contain items such as values – entities external to persons and authoritative over their behavior Moral Skepticism: there do not exist entities or relations of a certain kind, objective values or requirements, which many people have believed to exist. o Moral judgments are equivalent to reports of the speakers own feelings or attitudes. o Moral Skepticism: the denial of objective moral values. o Moral judgments involve a claim to objectivity which both non-cognitive and naturalist analyses fail to capture. o Moral skepticism must therefore take the form of an error theory, admitting that a belief in objective values is built into ordinary moral thought and language, but holding that this ingrained belief is false.
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Unformatted text preview: o Considerations that support moral Scepticism: 1. the relativity or variability of some important starting points of moral thinking and their apparent dependence on actual was of life. 2. The metaphysical peculiarity of the supposed objective values, in that they would have to be intrinsically action-guiding and motivating. 3. The problem of how such values could be consequential upon natural features. 4. the corresponding epistemological difficulty of accounting for our knowledge of value entities or features and of their links with the features on which they would be consequential. 5. The possibility of explaining how even if there were no such objective values people not only might have come to suppose that there are but also might persist in the belief....
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This note was uploaded on 03/23/2008 for the course PHI 202 taught by Professor Michaela.smith during the Spring '08 term at Princeton.

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