Case study Report (Pg. 342) - Tung Nguyen.doc - Business...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 3 pages.

Business and Society (MGMT 423)Tung Nguyen05/01/2018CASE STUDY:GOOD AND EVIL IN THE RAIL1.Introduction a.Describe the name of the company and its main activities (10 lines maximum). Robert M Sanchez: Greyhound bus driver, Amtrak engineer, Metrolink engineer.Metrolink: Commuter rail system crossing six Southern Calilfornia countiesCarries about 40,000 passengers a dayOver 380 miles of trackTracks shared with freight trafficSanchez’s history at Metrolink:5 informal discipline letters for absences2 oral councils for the use of his cell phone while on duly2008, a man ran in-front of Roberts train and killed himselfFriday, September 12, 2008Describing how the accident happenedThe investigation (NTSB – National Transportation Safety Board)Cause of the collision was engineer inattentionTexting was cited as the source of distractionb.Summarize the main issues mentioned in the case (1-1 ½ pages maximum). When groups present the case, they assume that all students in the class have already read the case. That is a wrong assumption. Hence the presenting group needs to give a summary of the case especially the points that are relevant to the questions asked.Case study is about the government involving and trying to regulate business specifically in the railroad industry. The case describes an example of railroad accident of Metrolink resulting in which 24 passengers died and over 100 people were injured in southern California. The cause of this accident was an act that is against regulations of an engineer of Metrolink named Robert M Sanchez about texting from the cab while on duty as operating the train. After the accident happened, the U.S. Congress passed a comprehensive law for preventing incident in the future which resulting in billions of dollars of cost to railroad companies. The most expensive part of the law required positive
train control costs “between $9.6 billion and $13.3 billion over 20 years” which is allowing remote operators to take control of a train if necessary. And the benefit-cost calculations performed by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) were just “$440 million to $674 million over 20 years”.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture