Changing Childhood Obesity updated.docx

Changing Childhood Obesity updated.docx - Running head...

This preview shows 1 out of 5 pages.

Running head: Changing Childhood Obesity 1 Changing Childhood Obesity Shalanda Pinder Walden University
Image of page 1

Subscribe to view the full document.

Childhood Obesity Abstract In this Policy Analysis you will have a complete understanding of how stakeholder, health care professionals policy makers are value obesity amongst adolescent in between the ages of 6-19 years of age. Everyday a child is diagnosed as obese, mandating policy and integrating innovation are ways to improve policy and revise policies. 2
Image of page 2
Childhood Obesity Changing Childhood Obesity Introduction and Problem Statement Amongst several epidemics we are faced with in the United States, childhood obesity is growing in high numbers in children between 2-19 years of age. Each day a child is diagnosed with a disease such as diabetes, hypertension and other co-morbid health conditions that can be associated with morbid obesity (National Task Force on the Prevention and Treatment of Obesity, 2000). Many studies says, that there are growing differences between sex and racial and ethnic groups (Hedley et al, 2004). Although obesity is outrageous for all children, the impact of this epidemic is higher for children of color. It was documented that about 38.2% of Latino children and 35.9% of African American children are obese compared to 29.3% of White children (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2009). For this reason, the CDC medical expenditures were as high as 78.5 billion in the year 1998 which was attributed to overweight and obesity (CDC). A key element in implementing statewide childhood obesity prevention policies is to ensure that state efforts are taking into consideration. Policies would improve access to healthy food choices, support healthy communities, and require healthy school initiatives. These functions would be creative ways to make a significant impact on children’s health. By creating environments across communities and schools where physical activity and access to healthy foods are the norm, states will decrease both the health costs and financial burden that childhood obesity generates, creating healthier, more vibrant communities for children and families. The positive effects of changing our food environment would create better nutrition and reduce obesity through a three-prong strategy which consist of altering relative food prices, 3
Image of page 3

Subscribe to view the full document.

Childhood Obesity shifting our exposure to food, and improving the image of healthy food while making unhealthy food less attractive (Mello, et al, 2003). These strategies would be beneficial for our society as we find new and innovative ways to fight childhood obesity. Over 29 million children would be without access to healthy affordable food. Many children are often living amongst food desert. A food desert means there aren’t supermarkets within a mile of their home (Ver Ploeg M, Breneman V, Dutko P, et al., 2012). Those children living in urban communities are often living in low income families. For this reason, urban communities are more subject to have high obesity rates, lack of employment, and are amongst depressed economies (Morton LW, 2008).
Image of page 4
Image of page 5
You've reached the end of this preview.
  • Spring '16
  • Dr Robert Swayzer
  • Nutrition, Childhood obesity, morbid obesity

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern