Le Tuan Hung - BBUS 24 - Literature Review Part 1 - 3 October 2016.docx

Le Tuan Hung - BBUS 24 - Literature Review Part 1 - 3 October 2016.docx

This preview shows 1 out of 4 pages.

LA TROBE UNIVERSITY BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM ***** SOCIAL MARKETING LITERATURE REVIEW – PART 1 Student’s name: Tuan Hung Le Class: Business Administration 24 Submitted to: Mrs. Thi Phuong Pham
Image of page 1

Subscribe to view the full document.

According to World Health Organization (WHO), the term “malnutrition” generally refers both to undernutrition – “ which includes stunting (low height for age), wasting (low weight for height), underweight (low weight for age) and micronutrient deficiencies or insufficiencies (a lack of important vitamins and minerals)”, and overnutrition – “ which includes overweight, obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases (such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and cancer)”. This essay will review and discuss various scholarly literatures on the subject of stunting prevalence among under five years children in terms of definition, current situation, and the most influential factors leading to this health condition. In order to provide a background of current situation of stunting prevalence among under five year children in Vietnam in specific and in the world in general, UNICEF, in cooperation with WHO and World Bank, has published the “Joint Child Malnutrition Estimates - Levels & Trends in Child Malnutrition” (2012). The report showed that the world number of stunting prevalence among under five year children had decreased significantly from an estimated 253 million to 165 million. To be more specific, from 1990 to 2011, the trend of global prevalence of stunting had declined from 40% to 26% with an average annual reduction rate of 2.1% per year. This trend is expected to drop down to 21.8% in 2020. However, the level of reduction differs markedly among regions. For example, in Africa stunting rate showed no significant changes after 20 years with the stable rate lying within the range of 40%, while that in Asia has dropped considerably from 49% in 1990 to 28%
Image of page 2
in 2010. According to the report, although this rate was reduced much or less, stunting remains a significant problem of public health in the majority of developing countries in the current time. In Vietnam, based on the paper namely “Statistics on the nutritional status of children through the years” (2016) – published on National Institute of Nutrition , and the article by Le Thi Hop - Chairman of the Vietnam Nutrition- titled “Some of the solutions strategy and nutrition programs in the future to reduce malnutrition among stunting children in Vietnam” (2011), it can be seen that Vietnam nutritional status has improved significantly over the past 30 years. Nearly 60% (59.7%) children were with stunting malnutrition in early 1980s and the number was decreased dramatically to 36.5% by the
Image of page 3

Subscribe to view the full document.

Image of page 4
You've reached the end of this preview.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern