JBSQ_June2012_11.pdf - Journal of Business Studies...

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Journal of Business Studies Quarterly 2012, Vol. 3, No. 4, pp. 145-153 ISSN 2152-1034 Research Proposal The Future of Female CEOs and Their Glass Ceiling Erik Buckalew Alexis Konstantinopoulos Jonathan Russell Seif El-Sherbini Saint Mary’s College of California Abstract The glass ceiling causes women to be underrepresented at top management positions compared to men, particularly the CEO. Through past research, we show the ways that women are equal to or more effective than men at leading companies. We address the factors which create the glass ceiling phenomenon, such as gender stereotypes about leadership styles. Finally, we look at how the glass ceiling and its related glass cliff impede women from reaching the CEO position and succeeding while being a CEO. Based on prior research, we propose three experiments which will test three hypotheses relating to female CEOs. The first is that companies are more likely to hire females as CEO if they are aware of the glass ceiling. The second proposes that women are better at leading than men. Lastly, the third is that the number of female CEOs will increase in the future due to changing landscapes of top-level management. Keywords: Females, CEO, management, job performance, glass ceiling, glass cliff, compensation gap. Problem When people think about the CEO position they think of a male, not a female. In today’s standards, the CEO position is a male dominated field, and there are not many females in this position. It could a lmost be considered a “gentleman’s club,” due to the lack of females presented. Since “women account for 51 per cent of the population and 46.5 percent of the labor force,” you would think that women would be better represented in the CEO position (Appelbaum et al., 2003, p. 43). Now even though CEOs are predominately male, this does not mean that females are not just as capable as their male counterparts. The opposite is actually true, and studies have even shown that “companies managed by a female CEO perf orm better than companies managed by males in large, medium, and small sized companies” (Vieito, 2012, p. 60). Due to these facts, we aim to address the fact that a stereotype exists between the Board of Directors decisions of male and female CEOs, and prove that women are effective as CEOs, and their numbers will continue to increase in this position.
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Journal of Business Studies Quarterly 2012, Vol. 3, No. 4, pp. 145-153 146 The main problem that we are discussing is the lack of female representation at top executive positions due to a glass ceiling effect, among other things. This problem is important because women should be more fairly represented in the position of CEO than they are presently. Women are more than capable to do just as good a job as their male counterparts, yet they are not given enough opportunity to shine. During a time when the workforce strives on the fact that it is diverse, you would think that there would be more women CEOs than there actually are.
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