Behavioral_Goals_Obj_021027.pdf - Behavioral Goals and...

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Behavioral goals and objectives for use in Individual Educational Plans in TUSD, April 2002 1 Behavioral Goals and Objectives The following examples of goals and objectives are written primarily for the use of support personnel in developing counseling goals for Individual Educational Plans. Writing behavioral goals and objectives A goal defines the end toward which effort is directed. Objectives define an outcome for a specific behavior, and incorporate the following: The conditions under which a specific behavior is to be observed or expected to occur The specific behavior the teacher will accept as evidence of achieving the objective The criteria (standard or level of performance) that is acceptable. Example Goal: Student will increase assertive behavior when feeling victimized by peers by May 2002, as measured by observation and data collection. Objectives: 1. S will identify verbally assertive responses when presented with alternatives, as measured by data collection. (This is the easiest level of performance) 2. When presented with a role play, S will state calmly what is bothering him, as measured by data collection. (This is a more difficult level of performance, as student must demonstrate the skill) 3. When feeling victimized, S will state calmly what is bothering him x% of the time, with one verbal prompt, as measured by observation and data collection. 4. When feeling victimized, S will state calmly what is bothering him x% of the time, as measured by observation and data collection. (This is the most difficult level of performance, as student must use the skill in a natural environment [such as a classroom or playground], rather than an artificial counseling setting) Note: The criteria used here include the manner of task performance (calmly) and also the frequency (75% of the time). Objectives 1, 2, 3, 4 illustrate stages in a teaching strategy. Location: The anticipated location of the performance of objectives can be general or special education classroom, playground, conference room etc. Method and frequency of evaluation: The method of evaluation can include data collection such as charting, use of standardized tools such as rating scales, and observations. Frequency of evaluation can be daily or weekly. Note: The following goals and objectives should be regarded as examples. Behavioral goals and objectives should be customized to the student’s needs. Goals and objectives should be selected with input from the student, as well as parents and teachers. Core curriculum goals are correlated with the following goals and objectives
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Behavioral goals and objectives for use in Individual Educational Plans in TUSD, April 2002 2 Behavioral Goals and Objectives I. Developing skills to be a self-directed learner Measurable Annual Goal: Student will increase behavioral control for age-appropriate participation in a group setting by (date), as measured by observation and charting.
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