Sharee_Williams_u04a1_TheoreticalFramework.pdf - Running head THE THEORETICAL ANALYSIS PERSON-CENTERED THEORY Unit 4 Theoretical Analysis

Sharee_Williams_u04a1_TheoreticalFramework.pdf - Running...

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Running head: THE THEORETICAL ANALYSIS: PERSON-CENTERED THEORY 1 Unit 4: Theoretical Analysis: Person-Centered Theory Sharee Williams COUN5239 – Theories of Psychotherapy Vicki Foster 5/6/2018
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THE THEORETICAL ANALYSIS: PERSON-CENTERED THEORY 2 Abstract The intention of this paper is to analyze the theoretical analysis and the theoretical application of person-centered theory. The person-centered approach is a non-directive client-centered approach that was created by Carl Roger. Roger’s approach is unique because it rejects the notion that practitioners have more insight into what is best for the client. Over the years, the person-centered approach has been studied by an array of researchers. The results of that research have determined that this approach is effective for an array of psychological conditions. Additional this theory aligns with many aspects that are essential for establishing cultural competency. Lastly, person-centered therapy is used to analyze a case study.
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THE THEORETICAL ANALYSIS: PERSON-CENTERED THEORY 3 Theoretical Analysis: Person-Centered Theory Person-centered therapy Person-centered therapy, which was founded by Carl Roger, is a non-directive, client- centered approach to psychotherapy. Carl Roger believed that humans have the innate ability to achieve self-actualization. In other words, people have the capacity to create goals for their lives, which will allow them to achieve their real self. This process can be illustrated by how an acorn automatically develops into a tree. Unfortunately, this innate process becomes hindered due to the fact that people wear masks that allows them to hide who they really are in order to socialize and fit in with others. As a result, when people fail to reach self-actualization, it is the counselor’s duty to unmask their clients in order for them to achieve their real selves. Although it is the counselor’s duty to help reveal the client’s real self, it is important to understand that Rodger radically diverted from the belief that the “the counselor knows best” and that a specific technique needs to be utilized in order to allow troubled clients to experience self-actualization (Corey, 2017, p. 166). Instead, Roger believed that counselors should only function as facilitator since “people are essentially trustworthy, that they have a vast potential for understanding themselves and resolving their own problems without direct intervention on the therapist's part, and that they are capable of self-directed growth if they are involved in a specific kind of therapeutic relationship” (Corey, 2017, p. 165). According to Roger, counselors can help reveal their client's real selves by utilizing emotion-focused therapy, genuineness congruence, unconditional positive regard (acceptance), and empathy. This enables the client to feel acceptance, which further encourages that client to accept themselves.
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