Ch 5 & 6 notes - Ch 5 Self-Concept Person's...

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Unformatted text preview: Ch 5 Self-Concept Person's self-perception as a physical, social, spiritual being. Cognitions A person's knowledge, opinions, or beliefs. Self-esteem One's overall selfevaluation. Self-efficacy Belief in one's ability to do a task. Learned helplessness Debilitating lack of faith in one's ability to control the situation. Self-monitoring Observing one's own behavior and adapting it to the situation. Organizational identification Organizational values or beliefs become part of one's self-identity. Personality Stable physical and mental characteristics responsible for a person's identity. Proactive personality Action-oriented person who shows initiative and perseveres to change things. Internal locus of control Attributing outcomes to one's own actions. External locus of control Attributing outcomes to circumstances beyond one's control. Humility Considering the contributions of others and good fortune when gauging one's success. Ability Stable characteristic responsible for a person's maximum physical or mental performance. Skill Specific capacity to manipulate objects. Intelligence Capacity for constructive thinking, reasoning, problem solving. Emotions Complex human reactions to personal achievements and setbacks that may be felt and displayed. Emotional intelligence Ability to manage oneself and interact with others in mature and constructive ways. Ch 6 1. Define self-esteem, and explain how it can be improved with Branden's six pillars of self-esteem. Self-esteem is how people perceive themselves as physical, social, and spiritual beings. Branden's six pillars of self-esteem are live consciously, be self- accepting, take personal responsibility, be self-assertive, live purposefully, and have personal integrity. 2. Define self-efficacy, and explain its sources. Self-efficacy involves one's belief about his or her ability to accomplish specific tasks.Those extremely low in self-efficacy suffer from learned helplessness. Four sources of self-efficacy beliefs are prior experience, behavior models, persuasion from others, and assessment of one's physical and emotional states. High self-efficacy beliefs foster constructive and goal-oriented action, whereas low self-efficacy fosters passive, failure-prone activities and emotions. 3. Contrast high and low self-monitoring individuals, and discuss the ethical implications of organizational identification. A high self-monitor strives to make a good public impression by closely monitoring his or her behavior and adapting it to the situation.Very high self-monitoring can create a chameleon who is seen as insincere and dishonest. Low self-monitors do the opposite by acting out their momentary feelings, regardless of their surroundings. Very low self-monitoring can lead to a one- way communicator who seems to ignore verbal andnonverbal cues from others. People who supplant their own identity with that of their organization run the risk of blind obedience and groupthink because of a failure to engage in critical thinking and...
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Ch 5 & 6 notes - Ch 5 Self-Concept Person's...

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