raine.docx - Use of Force The conflict in the use of force emphasizes the severity of a situation when social roles and personal impulses intertwine but

raine.docx - Use of Force The conflict in the use of force...

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“Use of Force” The conflict in “the use of force” emphasizes the severity of a situation when social roles and personal impulses intertwine , but it also emulates the doctor’s inner conflict between the psychic forces of reason and aggressive passion, between the ego and the id as both characters try to win this fight with a conduct that isn’t regulated by social norms. Mathilda's attack on the doctor indicates that she is unconcerned about the doctor’s ability of helping her or in his role in society as one to be respected. The doctor emphasizes her animal-like aggressiveness, characteristic of the id. " When Mathilda breaks they wooden spatula to splinters, her mother asks her: "Aren't you ashamed to act like that in front of the doctor?" He is socially superior to them because of his professional status, explaining why they are embarrassed. The doctor is annoyed with the mother when she refers to him as a nice man; he opposes the super-ego's concern with social convention. Eventually, he permits his id to dominate his ego, reflective of when the wooden spatula breaks. In the use of force, he loses his ability to reason:"But the worst of it was that I too had got beyond reason...and enjoyed it.” The doctor’s POV makes it possible to see the changes that take place in his mind as he progresses from cool professional to animalistic assailant. He could have justified on the basis of logic alone his persistence in forcing the examination. What he can’t justify even to himself is his motivation for doing so. He exposes for analysis his mental state just as he exposes for examination the little girl’s throat. Without the use of force, it would not have been possible for the doctor to obtain the necessary throat culture. Nevertheless, there is no doubt that the doctor derives pleasure from his attack, even if only for a moment. The moment a he uses force, he is already corrupted the deed.
Sonny Blues "Sonny's Blues" by James Baldwin focuses on whether a person should be conventional in making decisions for his life, or if he should do what he wishes to do. A child can make the mistakes that and adult cannot, at some point along one’s journey, one must leave childish things behind. Concealment of an introspective self or any other person becomes a societal expectation. According to his brother, who narrates "Sonny's Blues," Sonny was a bright-eyed young man full of gentleness and privacy. I wondered what he looked like now" (Baldwin 272). His physical
journey growing up in the streets caused a great deal of inner turmoil about whom he was and what kind of life he was to have, but while he is trying to figure it out, it’s increasingly taboo to talk about it. The narrator says, “Well Sonny,” I said gently, ‘you now people can’t always do what they want to do--” Sonny replies, “No, I don’t know that...I think that people OUGHT to do what the want to do, what else are they here for.” At a glance it seems to be about maturity, but

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