Session16_030118v2.pdf - J2451 JAPANESE LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION INSTRUCTOR DR NAOMI FUKUMORI Thursday March 1 2018 1 Reminder and Announcements The

Session16_030118v2.pdf - J2451 JAPANESE LITERATURE IN...

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1 J2451: JAPANESE LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION INSTRUCTOR: DR. NAOMI FUKUMORI Thursday, March 1, 2018
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Reminder and Announcements The Tale of Genji animation extra credit is due on Friday, March 2, 5pm, Carmen. •There is another extra credit option: a lecture on translation of Japanese literature by Prof. Jeffrey Angles, March 2, 4-5:30pm, Page Hall 10 (details on Carmen)
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3 Announcements • Film guide for Rash ō mon is on Carmen. Please take a look at it before Tuesday s session. We ll discuss the assigned stories and begin watching the film on Tuesday. We ll watch the remaining portion of the film on Thursday.
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4 Lady Sarashina/Sugawara Takasue s Daughter 20th century rendition
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5 Overview of Today s Lecture/ Discussion Sarashina Diary : Dreams versus Reality
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The Journey to the Capital as an Intertextual Experience Intertextuality: How one literary text relates to another through allusion and other less obvious means (recalling plot/story, style, and language of another work) The narrator experiences the sights through stories she has heard or is told; parallels with Genji ’s “Suma” chapter – * The tale of the Takeshiba princess (pp. 94-98) – The tale of Mt. Fuji and Fuji River (pp.102-104) – Poetic precedents (Ariwara no Narihira and the Sumida River [ Ariwara Middle Captain Collection/Tales of Ise ], “Then I would ask you something ” p. 98) – The capital, as well, has been experienced through texts.
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The Function of Tales in Heian Women’s Lives Lady Sarashina’s obsession with tales ( monogatari ) Several extant tales have been attributed to her ( Hamamatsu Middle Counselor’s Tales , Waking in the Night ) “Defense of Tales” in The Tale of Genji, “Vocabulary of Japanese Aesthetics I,” pp. 176-179: Tamakatsura defends tales as providing “an account of something that has really and actually happened.” Women “learn” about life from tales; have educational intents
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Lady Sarashina as a reader of Genji and other tales – How does she interpret the tale? – What does she read? Other extant tales, the calligraphy of the daughter of the provisional major counselor (p. 110) The role of women in transmitting tales; why do women perpetuate stereotypes in marriage? What does Murasaki Shikibu teach in her Tale of Genji ? What does Lady Sarashina learn/teach?
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Reading as Intertextual Practice, pp. 112-114 With my heart pounding with excitement, I was able to read, right from the first chapter, the Tale of Genji , this tale that had confused me and made me impatient when I had read only a piece of it. With no one bothering me, I just lay down inside my curtains, and the feeling I had as I unrolled scroll after scroll was such that I would not have cared even if I had had a chance to become empress! I did nothing but read, and I was amazed to find that passages I had somehow naturally learned by heart came floating unbidden into my head.
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