Chapter 17 Notes.docx - CHAPTER 17 SERVLIA MAESTA...

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CHAPTER 17 SERVĪLIA MAESTA translation (p.206) After dinner Servilia sits alone crying in her bedroom. The girl, seeking relief of her sorrow, holds the sparrow sitting on her lap. The sparrow plays and the sad girl crys. The name of the sparrow is Lesbia. Lesbia is famous because the poet Catullus loved her, just as all loving poets, he wrote many love poems about her. Lesbia also had a sparrow and Catullus wrote a famous poem about the death of that sparrow. All lovers ought to read the poems of Catullus. Servilia, having this poem in mind, cried to the chirping sparrow: “What is necessary to do, my pet? How will I lead my life with this unknown man? Iullus Antōnius is old! He is more than 35 years old! I will never live in the house of that old man! I will never give the old man my heart! I already gave my heart to the young man, Naevio! I will never give my heart to no other man. Perhaps I will give my heart to neither and neither will lead me into marraige! Perhaps living alone, I will never marry! “Oh, what is necessary to do, my pet? I do not know that Iullus! I never saw Iullus walking in the road! I never heard the voice of Iullus speaking. Woe is me! I do not want to marry such an unknown. I want to marry Cordus! I saw him walking in the garden! I heard the voice of Cordus speaking. Why does father give me to that unknown? Why are my parents being ignorant of Cordus and not listen to me? I don’t love Iullus but the other! Woe is me! My whole life will be miserable.” The hopping and chirping sparrow says nothing to the crying girl. Servilia gives the tip of her finger to the sparrow and the bird bites the finger of the crying girl with its beak. The bird frees the sad girl of concern in this way. Servilia, still miserable, laughs through the falling tears and “Sparrow,” says the girl, “you are my faithful friend.” Line 11, Dūcam – Future, 1 st person, singular, feminine (?) Line 15, Iullum & Ambulantem – accusative, singular, masculine Line 20, Rostrō – Ablative of means DĒ MŪNERIBUS translation (p.210) -was not in class to check- Sitting in another part of the home, Servilius, Marcus, and Lucius talked about the games/ public shows/spectacles. “Marcus and Lucius, will you (all) watch the games?” Servilius asked. “Certainly, father” responded Marcus. “There games will be magnificent! But who will we see standing in the amphitheater?” “We will see,” responded father, “gladiators fight with other gladiators. Some will fight with swords, others with trident and net. In one of the fights two gladiators will fight — one will fight with a sword and the other with the trident. Perhaps neither will exit from the amphitheater living.” Lucius asks: “Will there be animals in the games? What kind of animals?” “Yes, son” Father says. “Several gladiators and many criminals will fight with all the exotic animals from Africa. We will see lions and leopards and elephants. And we will also see bloody sand—blood and animals and people!” “Hurray!” Lucius asks, “When will we go to the amphitheater?”

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