BOS 3701 - Unit VI Assessment.pdf - BOS 3701 Industrial...

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BOS 3701 Industrial Ergonomics Unit VI Assessment QUESTION 1 Explain carpal tunnel syndrome. What structures are involved, and what pathology exists here? Recommend prevention tips and treatments for this syndrome. Explain the modified Allen test and Tinel's sign. Your response should be 200 words. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: the term carpal tunnel is a medical term for the space in the wrist where nerves and tendons pass from the forearm into the hand. Carpus is a word derived from the Greek word "karpos" which means "wrist." The wrist is surrounded by a band of ligament tissue that normally functions as a support for the joint and creates a capsule. The tight space between this fibrous band and the wrist bone is called the carpal tunnel. Knowing the structure of the hand helps understand why keeping the wrist straight while performing tasks is important. Looking closely, you can see that the median nerve lies just under the transverse carpal ligament. The nerve can be easily compressed or strained because it is just below a soft structure and subject to direct pressure from contact stress and internal pressure from awkward postures. The median nerve innervates the thumb and the first three fingers of the hand. The nerve transmits signals to and from the hand. If the median nerve is damaged, the sensation and strength of the hand is often compromised or lost. (Stack, Ostrom, & Wilhelmsen, 2016, pg. 305) Treat carpal tunnel syndrome as early as possible after symptoms start. Take more frequent breaks to rest your hands. Avoid activities that worsen symptoms and apply cold packs to reduce swelling also may help. Other treatment options include wrist splinting, medications and surgery. Splinting and other conservative treatments are more likely to help if you've had only mild to moderate symptoms for less than 10 months. (Mayo Clinic) Lifestyle and home remedies/steps may provide temporary symptom relief. Take short breaks from repetitive activities involving the use of your hands. Lose weight if you are overweight or obese. Rotate your wrists and stretch your palms and fingers. Take a pain reliever, such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen sodium (Aleve). Wear a snug, not tight, wrist splint at night. You can find these over-the-counter at most drugstores or pharmacies. Avoid sleeping on your hands. If pain, numbness or weakness recurs and persists, see your doctor. (Mayo Clinic) Allen test: The blood supply to your hand normally comes from two arteries from your wrist: the radial artery inner (thumb side of the wrist) and the ulnar artery (little finger side of your wrist). During your hand exam the physician will make sure that both arteries are open and working correctly. A simple physical test called the Allen test may be used to find out if the blood flow to your hand is normal. For

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