The Competing Values Framework.pdf - The Competing Values...

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How we change what others think, feel, believe and do | Menu | Quick | Books | Share | Search | Settings | The Competing Values Framework Explanations > Culture > The Competing Values Framework Cultural dimensions | Competing Values | OCAI | So what? The Competing Values Framework for cultural assessment was distilled by Quinn and Rorbaugh (1983) from analysis of Campbell's longer list of effectiveness dimensions into a two dimensional pattern. Cultural dimensions Horizontal: In/Out The horizontal dimension maps the degree to which the organization focuses inwards or outwards. To the left, attention is primarily inwards, within the organization, whilst to the right, it is outwards, towards customers, suppliers and the external environment. An internal focus is valid in environments where competition or customer focus is not the most important thing, but in competitive climates or where external stakeholders hold sway, then this challenge must be met directly. Vertical: Stability/Flexibility The vertical axis determine who makes decisions. At the lower end, control is with management, whilst at the upper end, it is devolved to employees who have been empowered to decide for themselves. Stability is a valid form when the business is stable and reliability and efficiency is paramount, but when environmental forces create a need for change, then flexibility becomes more important. The Competing Values map Flexibility and discretion Internal focus and integration Clan Adhocracy External focus and differentiation Hierarchy Market Stability and control The four hierarchies are to some extent historical in their development and are presented in this order below. Hierarchy The hierarchy has a traditional approach to structure and control that flows from a strict chain of command as in Max Weber 's original view of bureaucracy. For many years, this was considered the only effective way of organizing and is still a basic element of the vast majority of organizations. Hierarchies have respect for position and power. They often have well-defined policies, processes and procedures.
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