2018 week 7.pdf - MUSIC 17 Week Seven(May 14th The South...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
MUSIC 17
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Week Seven (May 14th) The South
Image of page 2
Notorious B.I.G. “Ten Crack Commandments” One of the hallmarks of his style was the ability to shi4 voice across and within tracks. A good early example is Warning This track does something similar Street lore as life lessons About the [email protected] of hustling rather than the general image
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lil Kim “Queen Bitch” Lil Kim, a member of the Notorious BIG-associated Junior Mafia, cul>vated an explicitly sexualized image that was new for hip hop, in part based on performers like Madonna Lyrics for this song were wriGen by Biggie, begging the ques>on of whose fantasy it is, and how it’s performed Demo Final
Image of page 4
Mary J Blige/Method Man “You’re All I Need” One of the most successful early a2empts at integra6ng hip hop and R&B. Remake of the Marvin Gaye/Tammi Terrell classic Produc6on is heavily indebted to hip hop methods: the beat is emphasized and musical details of the original are simplified for greated impact Method Man raps his verses, Mary J sings video
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lauryn Hill “Doo Wop/That Thing” Lauryn Hill was the breakout star of the Fugees a conscious pop/ rap group that was hugely successful in the 90s. She was equally talented as singer and MC and performs both roles on this track: rapping the verses and singing the choruses This track was the hit single from her solo album
Image of page 6
Song plays out a set of inter-related opposi4ons: 1960s vs 1990s; rapping vs singing; men vs women etc Takes rela4vely familiar narra4ves of gender conflict, but takes on both parts herself video
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Tricia Rose: Mutual Denials In this ar*cle she sets up a set of dialec*cs centering on common conten*ous issues in hip hop culture: Crea&ve Disregard Unadulterated Products Profi&ng from Black Suffering Invisible White Consump&on Sexism Isn’t Really a Problem Homophobia is OK
Image of page 8
The Rest of the Country Un$l the mid 1990s most hip hop that registered commercially was made in New York or in California (mostly L.A.) There were however scenes in many other ci$es, especially in the South Most of this music was aimed primarily at a local audience and released via smaller independent labels with a regional focus
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The South In most cases, Southern hip hop made connec4ons to older African American pop music tradi4ons that were also regionally specific This meant that, while sharing many influences with NY hip hop for instance, it also folded in other influences that were more specifically local As in New York, this wasn't just a maCer of falling back on local folklore and tradi4on but a complex integra4on of older styles and newer technologies and sensibili4es
Image of page 10
Primary centers in the South Houston (Suave House and Rap-a-Lot records) New Orleans (No Limit and Cash Money records) Atlanta Memphis
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
New Orleans New Orleans is in many ways unlike any other American city French influence Port city Proximity of Caribbean
Image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern