4.docx - 4.07 DBA Notes Red Scare Image Photograph of...

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4.07 DBA Notes: Red Scare Image: Photograph of Italians anarchists, Bartolomeo Vanzetti (left) and Nicola Sacco (right), who were accused of robbing a payroll delivery and murdering the guard in South Braintree, Massachusetts during the height of the post-WWI Red Scare What: With the rise of striking workers, such as police officers, steel workers, and coal miners, the American public feared a Communist revolution of their own was on the horizon. This period of general fear against radical thought is termed the Red Scare. When: 1919–1921 Significance: All together, about 6,000 people were rounded up during the Red Scare. Most were arrested without warrant and held without charge, in violation of the Constitution. The case of Sacco and Vanzetti symbolized the effects of Red Scare thinking. However, by the summer of 1920, the Red Scare had subsided. Most Americans realized that the threat of revolution had been exaggerated, and their own liberties threatened by the raids. Bureau of Investigation Image: Photograph showing anarchists, communists, and radicals who were rounded up in NYC during the Palmer raids by the Bureau of Investigation. What: Attorney General of the United States, A. Mitchell Palmer, created a special "anti- radical" branch of the Bureau of Investigation. This branch was called the General Intelligence Division. This was a small detective force whose duties were to study radical groups and identify their members. When: August 1919 Who: Attorney General Palmer appointed J. Edgar Hoover to head the new division Significance: The Red Scare would lead to the growth of this division. In a few years, it would become known as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, or FBI. Neutrality Acts Image: Senator Nye, a Republican from North Dakota, feeding isolationist sentiment in 1934 with a series of sensational Senate hearings. What: After World War I, isolationism grew. The country's costly involvement in World War I had made it wary of conflicts on the world stage. As a result of these feelings, Congress
passed a series of Neutrality Acts. These acts sought to ensure that the United States would not become entangled again in foreign conflicts. When: 1930s Significance: A series of Neutrality Acts passed between 1935 and 1937 prevented U.S. citizens from choosing sides in foreign conflicts. These acts kept citizens from selling arms and war materials to warring countries or traveling on warring ships. They also banned people from trading non-illegal items in anything but cash sales. Nations participating in these sales

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