research paper draft and interview

research paper draft and interview - The summer of 1964 in...

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The summer of 1964 in Mississippi, USA had been dubbed the “Freedom Summer.” Congress decided southern blacks had been oppressed long enough. Change was needed. The main goal of the summer was to integrate blacks to vote. In a state with a black population of a little over 40%, only 6% were registered to vote and even fewer actually did. The federal government devised a plan. Anyone from the North could sign up as an activist and risk their lives in the deep south for a good cause. Over 500, mostly wealthy, mostly white, students from elite private schools, volunteered. What would result would be one of the most memorable summers in United States history. In the Fall of 1963 Congress declared 1964 would be the Freedom Summer, Mississippians was not happy to say the least. “I guess the reason people in the South were upset because there were race riots goin’ on in Boston and Philadelphia, and all over the North, there was as much racism there as anywhere. But somehow the finger always got pointed South,” said Charles Blair, a Mississippi resident from 1961-1965. “Looking back, some parts of Mississippi weren’t even very racist. () where I lived was a relatively civilized town and would not have even been considered racist today I don’t think. Now,
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research paper draft and interview - The summer of 1964 in...

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