LADHSSA ASS 01 STUDENT 57176523.docx - STUDENT NO 57176523 LADHSSA ASSOGNMENT 01 UNIQUE NO 838275 QUESTION 01 Historical Evidence and Historical Sources

LADHSSA ASS 01 STUDENT 57176523.docx - STUDENT NO 57176523...

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STUDENT NO. 57176523 LADHSSA ASSOGNMENT 01 UNIQUE NO. 838275 QUESTION 01 Historical Evidence and Historical Sources A historical source refers to anything which survives from the time or tells us something form the past. Historical Sources are divided into 2 categories, namely 1. Primary 2. Secondary A source is not the same as evidence. A source becomes evidence when it is used to answer a question on the past. The following is an example of a source which can also be used as evidence. This is a source which can be used as evidence when asking “what were people in Sophiatown afraid of during the apartheid era? 1 Primary And Secondary Sources Primary Sources A primary source refers to something produced at the time an event took place. These are relied heavily on by historians to shed light on a specific event from which it dates back to. They are based on what people saw, heard or created at the time. Unwritten primary sources such as art, buildings, music, pottery, legend, photographs were often overlooked but now they give us extremely intricate insights into the events of the time which they are from. 1 Idea and photo taken from TL 501, LU 7 7.2 Information from TL 501 SECTION 02 LU 7
STUDENT NO. 57176523 LADHSSA ASSOGNMENT 01 UNIQUE NO. 838275 Primary sources are found in places like archaeological excavations, shipwrecks, old buildings, museums, libraries and private collections. Many written primary sources are published and should not be confused with secondary sources (see later explanation n secondary sources.) Primary sources along with modern science can paint a close to accurate picture of the times one is studying and the cultures and civilisations surrounding an event. Palaeontologists, calligraphists, linguist, epigraphists, palaeographers and numismatists analyse the primary sources and can give rise to a better understanding of the history that one is studying. Secondary Sources Secondary sources refer to the accounts or copies of the produced by people who have studied the primar6 sources. These must be used with extra caution and analysed as bias can creep in through interpretation. Secondary sources are useful when one cannot interpret any primary sources themselves but as stated above this must be done with caution. Secondary sources are often produced timeafter the event has taken place and therefore represent something whichdirec5ly represents an event, thus a “secondary” source. In practice it is difficult to assess whether a source is a primary or secondary source. Thus clues like dates times etc. can be very helpful in making such a judgment. Examples of secondary sources are textbooks, literary criticism, newspaper reports by someone who was not present at the time of the event. Example of a Primary and Secondary Source Event in History being studied – The Holocaust Primary Source – Below is an identity card of a Jewish woman. The card is stamped with a “J” following a 1938 Nazi regulation.

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