Walls of Pompeii

Walls of Pompeii - The Walls of Pompeii Andrea DeVos Art...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Walls of Pompeii Andrea DeVos Art History 151
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
Background image of page 2
Tablinium wall in the House of Sallust House of Sallust, Pompeii Mid 2 nd century BCE Fresco Pompeii The wall painting found in the House of Sallust is a prime example of the first style of wall painting. Although there isn’t much detail and it frankly doesn’t immediately jump out as a wall painting at all, it actually fulfills its main purpose. This purpose is to imitate the look of real stone architectural elements or masonry without actually having the cost of all the real stones being used, making it more affordable and an achievable look for a wider variety of people. 2 As the tablinium (what would be a modern day study) from the House of Sallust shows, the stucco was used very deliberately and effectively on the wall to create the appearance of actual stone blocks. It was then painted over in several different colors bringing life to it and giving the illusion that colored marble had been used. Essentially, the first style of wall painting was like buying cubic zirconium instead of a diamond. The patrons wanted the look of the real thing, but didn’t want to or simply couldn’t pay the full price. So they went for an imitation that did the job of making their prides as well as their pocketbooks happy. Bibliography: Copplestone, Trewin. Pompeian frescoes. London: Batchworth Press, 1961. De Carolis, Ernesto. Dei ed eroi nella pittura pompeiana . Rome: L'Erma di Bretschneider, 2000. Giovanni Guzzo, Pietro. Pompeii, picta fragmenta: decorazioni parietali dalle città sepolte. Torino: Umberto Allemandi, 1997. Pierre, Gusman. Mural decorations of Pompeii . New York: W. Helburn, 1924. Ward-Perkins, John, and Amanda Claridge. Pompeii AD 79 . New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2 Ward-Perkins, John, and Amanda Claridge. Pompeii AD 79 . New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1978.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
1978. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
Background image of page 4
Villa of the Mysteries Southwest corner of Villa of the Mysteries, Pompeii 60-40 BCE Fresco 1.62 m high Pompeii The beautifully vibrant frescoes found at the Villa of the Mysteries are the prime example of second style wall painting. The long narration tells the story of what is thought most commonly to be a mystery rite, part of a marriage ritual, between the Greek gods Dionysus and Ariadne, although no one can be sure and the issue is still hotly debated. 4 The painted figures are virtually life-sized and pop against the background of Pompeian red, creating a dramatic and dynamic series of scenes. The figures themselves show the artist’s attention to the human body and form and its position in the three dimensional space. It is such a good example of the second style because it’s obviously trying to give the feeling of receding space, which is a key element of the second style of wall painting. The painted narrative scenes take up half of the wall space, with
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 20

Walls of Pompeii - The Walls of Pompeii Andrea DeVos Art...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online