Notes.pdf - 1 History 010 17th Century 1600s AD Japan FINAL...

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1 History 010 17th Century - 1600s AD Japan FINAL EXAM Monday 8am - No blue book needed. Must understand - Japanese pyramid: Emperor Shogun Daimyo Samurai 95%, bushido - Japan has had an emperor going back 2000 years. Longest monarchy in history - 1st emperor was the grandson of the son which means ALL Japanese emperors claim to be descendants of the sun. - The emperor has been a figurehead with no military or political authority. Which meant the emperor played no real role in Japanese history. - 1868: Demanded to modernize to - 1945: Japanese wanted to keep fighting but the Japanese emperor said they would make peace if they surrendered. - Real political and power remained in the hands of someone else. The shogun Shogun - Hereditary position just like a king. When a shogun died, one of his sons would become the next. - Claim to rule on behalf of the emperor, but in reality throughout most of Japanese history, it was the shogun who was in charge. - Below the shogun were 2 ranks of mobility daimyo & samurai Daimyou & Samurai (Nobles) - Must be something you were born into. Must be born a noble. - It was easy to tell who was a noble and who wasn’t - Nobles (both men and women) had 2 names while everyone else had 1. Someone with 1 name was a commoner - Only nobles could carry weapons. Usually they carried 2 swords. - Nobles made up about 5% of the population. - Helped the shoguns run Japan. - ¾ of the islands of Japan were divided into 66 provinces. - There were 120 daimyo in Japan. Each daimyo ruled either all or part of a province. Each daimyo was responsible to the Shogun meaning in their territory, the daimyo collected the taxes for the
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2 shogun, enforced the laws of the shogun, worked on projects for the shogun (built roads, harbors & whatever else shogun demanded), and daimyo served in the army of the shogun. - The nobles were the officers in the army and most of the soldiers were commoners. - When the shoguns called, the nobles had to recruit commoners to serve with them. - Only one shogun at a time. - Below the daimyo is the samurai and whatever the daimyo fulfilled for the shogun, the samurai would serve for the daimyo. Samurai ruled territories on behalf of the daimyo. - All these nobles lived by a code Bushido code: The way of the warrior. Bushido code - Embodied certain ideals that all Japanese nobles hoped to live up to. They aspired to live up to. - Ex: ultimate loyalty of all Japanese should be to the emperor. - Ex: noble should never betray his superior. - Ex: never to act cowardly in battle. - Ex: never supposed to allow yourself to be captured by an enemy. - If he did not act bravely in battle or be captured, not only he would be humiliated, but it’d be a humiliation of entire family both living and dead.
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  • Fall '17
  • CALLHAN
  • History, japan, Samurai, Tokugawa shogunate, Tokugawa Ieyasu, Shogun, Oda Nobunaga

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