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Anderson 1 Shauntel Anderson Professor Montoya English 102 20 November 2017 Classical Argument Paper Are helicopter parents doing more harm than good? The term helicopter parenting refers to parents who excessively monitor and involve themselves in their children’s lives, in order to prevent them from potential failure and harm. In recent years, helicopter parenting has become an increasing trend that has caught the attention of several schools and teachers across the nation. Many who have become aware of this type of parenting have developed strong arguments. Those who are for helicopter parenting claim that these parents can be useful resources for the education community, while those who are against helicopter parents argue that this type of parenting deprives children of their well-being and independence. Because helicopter parents don’t always have good intentions, these children can suffer mentally and experience developmental setback. Helicopter parenting is not always driven by a parent’s good intentions. Many of the parents who fall into the category of excessive parenting excuse their behavior as trying to ensure their children’s success by preventing them from potential failure. However, recent research has found that these parents’ justifications for their behavior don’t always prove to be true. According to the results of their study, conducted by Segrin et al., experts in communication and psychology, “overparenting tends to occur in critical family environments, which is somewhat counterintuitive given what is known about parental involvement more generally” (478). This quote explains that regardless of the common belief that parental involvement is
Anderson 2 mainly motivated by wanting to do what’s “best” for their child, results have found that an underlying motivation is due to an already established critical parent child relationship. According to Sue Shellenbarger, writer for the work and family column of the Wall Street Journal, overinvolved parents form their own self worth off of their children’s successes (2). From a study that she mentions in her article, results found that when parents have this kind of mentality, it “fosters more intense and volatile emotions in general - higher highs and lower lows” (Shellenbarger 2). This quote demonstrates that when parents believe that their children’s accomplishments reflect themselves as a parent, it can influence their emotions, which in turn, can eventually affect the way that they act towards their child. Similarly, Segrin et al. claims that

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