Biceps Tendinopathy Research Article.docx - Abstract Biceps tendinopathy is a pathology of the proximal biceps brachii tendons involving either the

Biceps Tendinopathy Research Article.docx - Abstract Biceps...

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Abstract Biceps tendinopathy is a pathology of the proximal biceps brachii tendons, involving either the short head or long head. In most cases, it is the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) that is injured, as tendinopathy of the short head is rare. The LHBT is an intraarticular glenohumeral joint structure that when injured can contribute to other shoulder pathologies, including labral tears or rotator cuff tendinopathy. Prior to entering the glenohumeral joint, the LHBT traverses the bicipital groove, which is another area where damage to the tendon is possible. Individuals with biceps tendinopathy will complain of anterior shoulder symptoms (pain and/or fatigue) during repetitive shoulder motions, as well as have limited active and passive shoulder range of motion (ROM). Although biceps tendinopathy can be an isolated pathology, it is commonly present in conjunction with other injuries, making its diagnosis and management complicated. Treatment plans need to take into consideration the age, physical appearance, and physical activity of patients in addition to the severity of the condition, as all of these factors will contribute to determining if conservative treatment or surgery will be necessary. This continuing education module is designed to give the reader/learner an increased understanding of biceps tendinopathy, including its clinical presentation and treatment, in an effort to aid the clinician in caring for patients with this diagnosis. One contact hour, or 0.1 CEU, of continuing education credit is available for those who successfully complete the post- test and evaluation form. Indexing Metadata/Description Title/condition: Biceps Tendinopathy Synonyms: Biceps tendinopathy; bicipital tendonitis/tendinitis; bicipital tenosynovitis; tendinopathy, biceps; tendinosis, biceps Anatomical location/body part affected o The proximal biceps has two separate tendons, a short head and a long head. The short head of the biceps tendon attaches to the coracoid process, whereas the long head attaches to the supraglenoid tubercle, located on the superior glenoid labrum. Of the two tendons, it is the long head that usually is injured during proximal biceps tendinopathy, whereas injury to the short head is rare ( 1 , 2 ) o The long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) traverses the bicipital groove on its way to the superior labrum. The transverse humeral ligament overlaps the bicipital groove, but has been found to contribute very little to biceps stability, which is contrary to initial reports. ( 1 , 3 ) The LHBT traverses through the rotator interval, which is an area between the subscapularis and supraspinatus. Within this area, the coracohumeral ligament and the superior glenohumeral ligament
compose a “pulley system,” or “biceps sling,” that provides stability for the LHBT ( 4 , 5 ) o The LHBT is also an intraarticular shoulder structure, so biceps pathology can result in other shoulder conditions (e.g., subscapularis tendon ruptures, superior labral tears anterior to posterior [SLAP] lesions) ( 1 ) o

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