Myofascial Pain Syndrome Research Article.docx - Abstract MPS is a regional pain disorder characterized by one or more myofascial trigger points in a

Myofascial Pain Syndrome Research Article.docx - Abstract...

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Abstract MPS is a regional pain disorder characterized by one or more myofascial trigger points in a taut band of muscle fibers and specific patterns of pain associated with each trigger point . Several mechanisms of injury have been proposed to cause MPS, but a common underlying pathology is a hyperirritable nociceptive neuron within the trigger point . Peripheral sensitization of nociceptors as well as central sensitization might explain the development of the persistent hyperalgesic state of trigger points. Fibromyalgia, a similar but more common and disabling muscle pain condition, should be ruled out. MPS is often chronic and refractory to conventional physical therapy. There is no consensus regarding best practice for treating trigger points. Methods often used to manage patients with MPS include various manual techniques, electrotherapeutic modalities, and acupuncture. Therapeutic exercise and functional training might be indicated to restore strength, flexibility, and normal posture in persons with MPS. Indexing Metadata/Description Title/condition: Myofascial Pain Syndrome Synonyms: Chronic myofascial pain; localized fibrositis; trigger-point pain; myogelosis; pain syndrome, myofascial; pain, trigger-point; myofascial trigger-point; trigger-point, myofascial Anatomical location/body part affected: Commonly involves a muscle in the periscapular area, shoulder, neck, or jaw/localized to specific muscle fibers and the covering fascia (1 ,2 ) Area(s) of specialty: Orthopedic Rehabilitation Description o Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a regional pain disorder characterized by a hyperirritable trigger point(s) in the affected muscle . Pressure on an active trigger point might stimulate a nociceptor neuron that refers pain to surrounding tissue ( 1 , 2 ) o The diagnosis of MPS generally is based on the identification of trigger points in classic locations and specific patterns of pain associated with each trigger point ( 3 , 4 ) o There is no clear consensus regarding best practice for treating trigger points. Popular methods used to manage patients with MPS include various manual techniques, electrotherapeutic modalities, and acupuncture. Therapeutic exercise and functional training might be indicated to address functional deficits in strength, flexibility, and posture
o The differential diagnosis should rule out fibromyalgia , a similar but more widespread and disabling muscle pain condition that includes the presence of multiple (at least 11 of 18) diagnostic tender points without referred pain . Fibromyalgia mainly affects women (who often present with coexisting emotional distress) and is associated with poor sleep and chronic fatigue ( 5 ) For more information on fibromyalgia, see the Clinical Review… Fibromyalgia ; Topic ID Number: T708490 o Trapezius myalgia is another condition closely related to MPS, with trigger points often found in the upper trapezius muscle For more information on chronic idiopathic neck pain, see Clinical Review…Neck Pain, Chronic: Idiopathic ; Topic ID Number: T708762 o

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